August 9, 2010

Smartphones to work as translators for soliders in Afghanistan

A U.S.jpeg The National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) is working with DARPA on a new project that would put smartphones in the hands of soldiers in Afganistan to work as translators. Fortune reports.

quotemarksright.jpg Three competing speech recognition and translation technologies are vying to participate in the 'TRANSTAC project,' which will take a soldier's English, recognize the speech, translate it into Pashto and then spit it out using text to speech. All of this happens in a matter of seconds using wireless Internet and servers somewhere else in the world to do the heavy lifting.quotesmarksleft.jpg

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Related:

-- US Military enlists iPhones and iPods for battlefield - A new program, Vcommunicator, is now being issued to soldiers in Iraq and Afghanistan. It produces spoken and written translations of Arabic, Kurdish and two Afghan languages. It also shows animated graphics of accompanying gestures and body language, and displays pictures of garments, weapons and other objects.

-- Real Time Voice Translation Coming to Cell Phones - Instant speech translation, a longtime dream of science-fiction writers, is already feasible in certain situations, vendors said at the Mobile Voice Conference in San Francisco.

-- MADCAT to take over translation for troops - Soldiers overseas are bombarded with foreign language images in the form of road signs, print media, captured documents, and graffiti... MADCAT provides "relevant, distilled, actionable information" to commanders and troops on the ground by translating foreign language text images accurately and automatically.

-- Speech Recognition iPhone app translates Arabic on the fly - a new app for iPhone and Blackberry can convert spoken Arabic into spoken English (and vice versa).

-- Phones to serve as doctors, translators - A Samsung 4G device would act as a simultaneous interpreter. The 4G device should break down communication barriers by providing translation and interpretation functions

-- English-Arabic translation by SMS offerd in Jordan - Zain customers send the text that needs translation to 93020 and will receive by text message, an immediate translation.

-- LG Telecom mobile offers translation services in Korean, English and Japanese - The service offers fifty thousand frequently used English expressions, such as “Thanks for sparing your precious time for me” so that users can improve their English proficiency.

-- Business Translator for cell phones - Player X and CNN Mobile will release CNN Business Translator phrase guides for mobile phones on Orange in the UK.

-- Text Messaging Gets a Translator - Aa New York City startup called Transclick rolls out software that translates e-mail and text messages with just one click.

-- TOMP (Translation On Mobile Phones) - No registration nor additional software is required to access the TOMP service, and it will work on any phone that is subscribed to a UK network provider, even when roaming abroad.

-- Free phones aid tourists lost in translation - The Kyoto prefectural government launches a project to lend 500 mobile phones with language-translation and road-navigation functions to foreign visitors.

-- English-Arabic translations via SMS - Emirates Telecommunications Corporation (Etisalat) tannounced the launch of the new Tarjim service, which allows mobile users to receive translations between Arabic and English of words or phrases.

-- SMS translator - A computerized SMS translation service called TransClick, provides quick and accurate translations between most major languages.

-- My Taylor is Rich: Translation cell phone - A groundbreaking cell phone that automatically translates the speaker's language from Japanese to English and vice versa could be on the market by 2007.

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emily | 9:48 PM | Technology | Add this this entry to your del.icio.us bookmarks. Digg This Technorati search results for this Entry
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