Archives for the category: 3D printed toys

May 15, 2014

3D printing firm MakerBot teams up with Sesame Street

_74874918_snuff1.png 3D printing firm MakerBot is bringing a downloadable Sesame Street figurine to its digital store, the first such file for its newly licensed brand. [via the BBC]

quotemarksright.jpgMr Snuffleupagus is currently the only Sesame Street character on offer, although the company intends to release more in the future.

The mini Mr Snuffleupagus will fit in the palm of your hand. It's available in a number of different colours, takes three hours to print and costs $1.29.

The files required to print the monster work on only two of MakerBot's 3D printers: the Replicator 2 and the fifth generation model of the original Replicator.

"Sesame Street has always been near and dear to my heart," said MakerBot chief executive Bre Pettis, a former employee at Jim Henson's Creature Shop.quotesmarksleft.jpg

Read more.

emily | 5:17 PM | permalink

April 28, 2014

Disney experimenting with 3D printing teddy bears in felt

3d_printed_felt_bear.jpg Disney Research is looking into leveraging the technique to create soft toys that children can snuggle without fear of scratching their sensitive skin. [via engadget]

quotemarksright.jpgThe prototype machine uses wool felt and a sewing machine like needle mechanism to connect one layer to the next. The result is a soft and pliable creation based on a standard CAD model that could be used with any other 3D printer.

More importantly though, the felt can be layered around other materials to introduce stiffness, embed electronic hardware or even create moveable appendages. So you could create a completely custom teddy bear that hugs your child and speaks.quotesmarksleft.jpg

Read full article.

emily | 10:26 PM | permalink

April 23, 2014

Model plane and train 3D printing kits to go on sale

3d_2890467b.jpg British model making company I Can Make has announced plans to launch a set of model plane and train kits for construction via 3D printer. The Telegraph reports.

quotemarksright.jpgThe 12 kits include plans to recreate miniature versions of Stephenson's Rocket, a Gloster E28/29 Jet and a Spaceship One, and will go on sale in the autumn.

Customers purchase their desired kit online before downloading the design file, and printing it on a 3D printer. Each design can be printed multiple times in a colour of the creator's choice.quotesmarksleft.jpg

Read full article.

emily | 9:22 PM | permalink

March 3, 2014

Lego mulls letting customers 3D print their own bricks

82a39578-90a6-4c5a-be94-905adbcad5ab.jpg Faced with declining sales due to competition from digital games, Lego is among the companies looking at 3D printing as a potential fix. The Danish plastic brick manufacturer told The Financial Times that it is considering “what potential opportunities there are for consumers.” GigaOM reports.

quotemarksright.jpgLegos are very easy to print on home 3D printers (in fact, some people are already printing them). 3D printing also opens up the opportunity for highly customized shapes, which could expand what people are able to make. But Lego isn’t considering 3D printing bricks itself; it’s more about printing them efficiently, and currently prints about 2,000 bricks a second.quotesmarksleft.jpg

[via The FT]

emily | 8:20 PM | permalink

December 26, 2013

Quin, a fashion doll that can be customized and 3D printed

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Quin, a Kickstarter project, is a fashion doll that can be customized and 3D printed.

Let's say you want Quin to wear Barbie shoes. If you have a file for Quin's lower leg that matches Barbie's foot profile, you just need to print that file and replace her previous lower legs with the new Barbie-like feet. Now your Quin will be able to wear most any Barbie shoe you've previously purchased.

Other features that can be customized: hairstyles, eye styles, elbow styles, hand style and knee styles.

emily | 11:26 AM | permalink

September 16, 2013

Disney's Software Could Let You 3-D Print Your Own Mechanical Toys

Disney wants to bring the magic of animation to the masses. FastCompany reports.

quotemarksright.jpgBefore interactive apps, before CGI, and before cinema, a lot of what we'd call "animated entertainment" consisted of little hand-cranked robots. These toys, called automata, were mechanical wonders whose appeal rested on novelty: If you turn the crank, what will this lifeless hunk of wood do? The purposely exposed mechanisms--full of oddly shaped gears, threads, ratchets, and spindles--only served to heighten the intrigue.

Now, some geeks at Disney Research have decided to reboot this old-school style of physical animation for the age of 3-D printing and computer-assisted design. Here's a preview of their prototype app:

The software team, led by Stelian Coros and Bernhard Thomaszewski in Disney Research's Zurich lab, sought to create a way to make the design and fabrication of automata as easy as dorking around with iMovie--or maybe Final Cut Pro. quotesmarksleft.jpg

Read more.

emily | 7:18 PM | permalink

June 30, 2013

Tiny 3D printed car with moving wheels

This tiny little car (1cm in length) designed by David Sun, printed on the Objet Eden 3D printer and showcased on Shapeways, is fully assembled with a steering wheel, seats and turning wheels.

[via boingboing]

emily | 10:09 AM | permalink

June 6, 2013

Petfigs: Eerily realistic 3D printed reproductions of a pet

Almost-as-real-as-it-gets.jpg 3DPrintingInudstry reports on a new trend coming from Japan, of all places, the petfig, eerily realistic 3D printed reproductions of a pet.

quotemarksright.jpgYoshinobu Kakumura converts and compose the flat images into 3D models. The actualization of the process comes via Shapeways, who are responsible for 3D printing the lifeless, yet alive-looking figures and delivering them to the users straight out of the oven of additive manufacturing (cost: $250).quotesmarksleft.jpg

Read more.

Related: - Human Doll Cloning: Japanese Company 3D Prints Real People's Faces On Toys

emily | 8:44 AM | permalink

May 23, 2013

Human Doll Cloning: Japanese Company 3D Prints Real People's Faces On Toys

Screen Shot 2013-05-23 at 8.27.51 AM.png Clone Factory, a Japanese start-up that specializes in 3D printing human faces, will print your face and put it on a doll's body, or it will capture the likeness of a cherished pet. For a a mere $1,300. The Huffington Post reports.

quotemarksright.jpgHow does it work? As Culture Japan's Danny Choo discovered, the "cloning" process is fairly straightforward. Basically, the subject sits in a chair surrounded by digital SLR cameras and has his or her picture taken in a sequence. A digital map of the subject's head is rendered together by a technician, then printed into plaster.quotesmarksleft.jpg

Read more.

emily | 8:23 AM | permalink

January 31, 2013

Makies custom 3D-printed toys, now in color

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Makes are the custom, 3D printed dolls that come from MakieLab, the company founded by Cory Doctorow's wife Alice. [via boingboing]

quotemarksright.jpgMakies are amazingly poseable 10" action dolls designed by you. You choose the eyes, nose, mouth, hair, even the width of the smile and shape of the hands.

We make your exact doll using robots and secret sauce, dress it up and send it to you in the post.

New Fantastic: four! We present to you: Ice Frosting, Strawberry Milk, Cocoa Bean and Pale Pistachio. You can now order hand dip-dyed Makies, and the results are this delicious body-blush of colour. Note the variation, the “organic” effect, and the unique finish: your hand-dyed Makie won’t look like a uniform-plastic doll, but a feisty little piece of art.quotesmarksleft.jpg

@ttranpham

emily | 5:50 PM | permalink

January 24, 2013

Print-to-Order Service Helps 3-D Designer Revive Forgotten Figurines

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For the playthings that are unfairly granted a short run in the stores, 3-D printers can add a new chapter to their story. Toy designer Wayne Losey's ModiBots is the exact definition of this, an evolution of a toy design that had unfulfilled promise after a short-lived launch. Wired reports.

More figurines on Flickr. Buy ModiBot kits and accessories at the Shapeways BotShop.

emily | 8:48 AM | permalink

November 29, 2012

Transforming robot made with 3D printed parts

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A walking, bipedal robot that can transform into a sleek street car may sound like the stuff of Hollywood fiction, but visitors to the Maker Faire in Tokyo next week will be in for a treat when they encounter the Brave Robotics Transforming Robot 7.2.

quotemarksright.jpgThis 1:12 scale robot can walk around in the familiar shuffling gait of its humanoid counterparts, while shooting missiles from weaponised forearms.

In a matter of seconds the robot transforms into a fully functional vehicle that can be driven around just like a standard RC toy car.

Further enhancements include a wifi camera that sends a live stream from the transforming robot to a nearby tablet.quotesmarksleft.jpg

[via Ponoko. Watch video.]

emily | 8:18 AM | permalink

September 7, 2012

3D printing records for a Fisher Price toy record player

160914245286.jpeg Wholesome old toys are back in vogue, and vintage Fisher-Price Record Players are a hot item on eBay. Fred at instructables has figured out how to make new records for the original toy with a 3-D printer.

See how it's done here.

[Fastcodesign via Core77 via @melissaterras]

Related article - 3D print your own custom music records

emily | 2:41 PM | permalink

April 5, 2012

How A Geek Dad And His 3D Printer Aim To Liberate Legos

uck-00f01m_thumb_large.jpeg Last March, hacker and professor at Carnegie Mellon Golan Levin and his former ­student Shawn Sims released a set of digital blueprints that a 3-D printer can use to create more than 45 plastic objects, each of which provides the missing interface between pieces from toy construction sets. Forbes reports.

quotemarksright.jpgThey call it the MakerBot’s $1,100 Thing-O-Matic can download those files and immediately print a plastic piece that connects their Lego bricks to their Fischertechnik girders, their Krinkles to their Duplos, or half a dozen other formerly incompatible sets of modular plastic blocks, sticks and gears.

... Levin and Sims have been careful. The patents on all the toys ­integrated in their kit expired years ago. But a copyright lasts many decades longer than a patent, and that’s the cudgel lawyers are using against downloadable objects.quotesmarksleft.jpg

Read full article.

emily | 10:19 AM | permalink