Archives for the category: 3D printed guns

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February 27, 2014

A New Radar Scanner Can Detect 3D-Printed Guns

According to Motherboard, a UK company is getting ready to sell the first scanner that can detect 3D-printed guns, using a mix of radar technology and artificial intelligence.

quotemarksright.jpgThe technology was developed by researchers at Manchester Metropolitan University and helped along by funding from city police. The developers inked a deal with scanner/detector company Radio Physics Solutions to make the device commercially available, as soon as this spring. They’re currently running a campaign on the crowdfunding site Syndicate Room to hurry along that process.quotesmarksleft.jpg

Read more.

emily | 8:41 PM | permalink

January 22, 2014

3D-Printed Gun Creator Cody Wilson Lands Quarter Million Dollar Book Deal

Screen Shot 2014-01-22 at 6.16.41 PM.png Cody Wilson, who leads the 3D-printed gun group Defense Distributed, signed a quarter-million dollar deal with Simon & Schuster’s Gallery imprint in December to write a non-fiction book chronicling his quest to create the first fully 3D-printable lethal weapon. Forbes reports.

The book’s working title is Negative Liberty, Wilson says, based on a principle of freedom from external restraints in libertarian political theory.

quotemarksright.jpgThe whole point to me is to add to the hacker mythology and to have a very, very accurate and contentious portrayal of what we think about the current political situation, our attitude and political orientation, a lasting remark,” he says. “It won’t be a manifesto. But culturally I hope to leave a couple of zingers…a touchstone for the young, disaffected radical towards his own political and social development, that kind of thing.quotesmarksleft.jpg

Read full article.

emily | 6:03 PM | permalink

December 10, 2013

3D-printed gun ban rejected by Senators

Screen Shot 2013-05-03 at 4.56.15 PM.png The US Senate has rejected calls to update the law in response to the advent of plastic guns made with 3D printers. Engineering & Technology reports.

quotemarksright.jpgThe Democrat-led body passed a bill last night that extends the Undetectable Firearms Act of 1988, which bans firearms that can pass undetected through metal detectors, for another 10 years. The Republican-led House of Representatives approved the bill last week.

President Barack Obama signed the legislation into law before the ban was to expire at midnight, but some Democrats have criticised a failure to close what are seen as loopholes created by new technologies, such as 3D printing, an aide said.quotesmarksleft.jpg

Read full article.

emily | 2:17 PM | permalink

November 25, 2013

Philadelphia becomes the first US city to ban 3D-printed guns

Screen Shot 2013-11-25 at 8.11.08 AM.png After the release of two 3D-printable firearms was met by warnings from lawmakers, Philadelphia has become the first US city to ban 3D-printed guns. The Philadelphia city council voted unanimously to pass a bill banning the practice on Thursday, reports The Verge.

quotemarksright.jpg Philadelphia's response to this new flavor of firearms manufacturing isn't surprising; According to FBI crime statistics, Philly reported 331 murders in 2012, ranking it among the most violent cities in the US.

Action against 3D-printed firearms is also being taken at the national level. It took the State Department only days to get plans for the Liberator pulled offline, and Senator Chuck Schumer (D-NY) is currently looking to extend a federal law banning "undetectable' firearms to guns built in 3D printers. But measures like these are largely preemptive right now, since 3D-printed guns are still highly experimental, unreliable, and expensive. At the moment, it's still much easier to buy a small handgun on the street or even build an undetectable AK-47 with the right plans.quotesmarksleft.jpg

Read full article.

emily | 8:09 AM | permalink

November 15, 2013

Feds release test results on 3D printed guns

The Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives (ATF) this week released videos of tests of plastic guns made with 3D printers that show some exploding on the first shot. The explosions could injure users, the testing found. ComputerWorld reports.

quotemarksright.jpgThe ATF has been testing guns made with 3D printers using two commonly used thermoplastic materials over the past year to determine how safe the weapons are.

Guns made using one of the two thermoplastics tested, a polymer from VisiJet, never lasted more than one shot before exploding. The other material, acrylonitrile butadiene styrene (ABS), could produce a gun that fired 8 times without incident.

The agents stopped shooting after 8 bullets, an ATF spokesperson said.

The spokesperson wouldn't identify 3D printers used or which computer-assisted drawing (CAD) files were downloaded to create the weapons.

The ATF also released a list of answers to commonly asked questions about 3D printed firearms.quotesmarksleft.jpg

Read full article.

emily | 8:12 AM | permalink

November 7, 2013

World’s First 3D Printed Metal Gun handles 50 rounds of successful firing

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According to their press release, Solid Concepts, a provider of additive manufacturing, 3D printing, rapid prototyping, tooling and injection molding services in North America, has manufactured the world’s first 3D Printed Metal Gun using a laser sintering process and powdered metals.

The gun, a 1911 classic design, has already handled 50 rounds of successful firing. The barrel sees chamber pressure above 20,000 psi every time the gun is fired.

Watch video.

quotemarksright.jpgWe’re proving this is possible, the technology is at a place now where we can manufacture a gun with 3D Printing,” says Solid Concepts’ Vice President of Manufacturing Kent Firestone. “As far as we know, we’re the only 3D Printing Service Provider with a Federal Firearms License (FFL). Now, if a qualifying customer needs a unique gun part in five days, we can deliver.quotesmarksleft.jpg

Read more.

Why the first 3D-printed gun shouldn’t freak people out (GigaOM) - Metal 3D printed guns aren’t going to be printable by the average person anytime soon.

emily | 3:23 PM | permalink

November 1, 2013

Cody Wilson raising $50,000 for an anarchist Bitcoin Wallet

According to The Verge, Cody Wilson, creator of the 3D-printed gun, is raising $50,000 on the crowdfunding site Indiegogo to develop a service aimed at returning the digital currency Bitcoin to its anarchist roots.

quotemarksright.jpgDark Wallet is an app for storing, sending, and receiving Bitcoin, with some extra security features built in. As law enforcement cracks down on services using Bitcoin to evade authorities — the recent bust of the underground drug market Silk Road being the most notable example — Wilson and his co-founder Amir Taaki decided it was important to add new protections.

To accomplish this, Taaki and developer Pablo Martin built a protocol called "trustless mixing." This tactic, which will be built into Dark Wallet, allows a group of Bitcoin users to mix their coins together into one big transaction before it is encoded into the "blockchain," the currency's public ledger.quotesmarksleft.jpg

Read more and watch Cody Wilson present The Dark Wallet, an "unsystem project".

More on Bitcoin: An Abridged History of Bitcoin published by the NYTimes and a video explaining What is Bitcoin?.

emily | 8:24 AM | permalink

October 25, 2013

Police 'Find First 3D Gun-Printing Factory'

printer-1-522x293.jpg In what is believed to be the first case of its kind, officers in Manchester on Thursday seized a printer and other components potentially used in the manufacture of firearms during a raid. Sky reports.

quotemarksright.jpgIn a statement Greater Manchester Police said: "Component parts for what could be the UK's first ever 3D gun have been seized by Greater Manchester Police.

"During the searches, officers found a 3D printer and what is suspected might be a plastic clip and a 3D trigger which could be fitted together to make a viable 3D gun.

"It they are found to be viable components for a 3D gun, it would be the first ever seizure of this kind in the UK. The parts are now being forensically examined by firearms specialists to establish if they could construct a genuine device.

"A man has been arrested on suspicion of making gunpowder and remains in custody for questioning."quotesmarksleft.jpg

Read full article.

UPDATE Calm down, a ’3D-printed gun’ hasn’t been found by police in the UK

emily | 8:21 AM | permalink

October 7, 2013

Fears over 3D printer weapons

According to The Telegraph, security officials fear criminals in the UK could use 3D printers to develop weapons and are urgently looking at ways to combat the threat.

quotemarksright.jpgThere is no evidence so far of weapons being created in such a way in the UK but the Home Office is concerned.

The threat was highlighted in its serious and organised crime strategy which warned: “We need to develop countermeasures for the imminent risk that 3D printing will facilitate the manufacture of weapons or parts of weapons.quotesmarksleft.jpg

Read full article.

emily | 6:17 PM | permalink

September 20, 2013

DEFCAD Launches ‘The Pirate Bay’ of 3D Printing

defcad.png

The people behind the first 3D-printable gun have quietly launched a brand new search engine for 3D-print models. The site, defcad.com, is currently in alpha release but even without press attention its library has quickly grown to nearly 75,000 files. Like The Pirate Bay, the new search engine allows users to add links without storing any of the files on its own servers. “We hope to build a piece of infrastructure to help stem the next wave of the IP wars in advance,” founder Cody Wilson tells TorrentFreak.

quotemarksright.jpg... “In March of this year, seeing an opportunity to expand the DEFCAD concept to fight the prevailing ideas about intellectual property in the entire physible space, I split Defense Distributed and DEFCAD and turned the latter into another company,” Wilson tells TorrentFreak.

“The idea was to move away from direct hosting to employ the first amendment victories won by Google in the courts and become a meta-search engine as a more robust way of spreading and preserving physibles. We hope to build a piece of infrastructure to help stem the next wave of the IP wars in advance, if you will.”

DEFCAD raised a significant amount of funds and has now quietly rolled out the meta-search engine to the public on DEFCAD.com. While still labeled as an Alpha release the site already indexes more than 74,000 files, all stored on external sites.... For now the most downloaded files on the new meta-search engine are, perhaps fittingly, guns. With more than 6,000 downloads The Liberator v1.1 is the most popular, followed by other gun designs, the FOSSCAD Atlas SSR and DMR Shanrilivan with over 5,000 downloads.quotesmarksleft.jpg

Read full article.

emily | 10:07 PM | permalink

September 15, 2013

London's Victoria and Albert Museum to display 3D printed gun

_69854278_guncrop.jpg A firearm dubbed the "Liberator", a working gun created using a 3D printer, has been acquired for display by London's Victoria and Albert Museum. The BBC reports.

quotemarksright.jpgIt was first made and fired by Texan law student and self-described anarchist Cody Wilson in May of this year.

The V&A will display two prototypes of the weapon, as well as one disassembled gun, as part of the London Design Festival which is running from 14-22 September.

Initially, these will be copies - printed in London - as Mr Wilson has so far been unable to obtain an export licence for the originals.

In a statement, the museum said the acquisition was "representative of current trends in design and society.quotesmarksleft.jpg

Read more.

emily | 5:45 PM | permalink

September 2, 2013

Five Absurd Redesigns Of The 3D-Printed Gun

Screen-Shot-2013-08-29-at-11.04.57-PM2.png Kyle McDonald’s take on the Liberator, the world’s first 3D-printed gun, is rather different: He turned it into a teapot. Andy Greenberg reports for Forbes.

quotemarksright.jpgEarlier this week McDonald, a Brooklyn-based artist and a member of the hacker art collective Free Art and Technology Lab, revealed a collection of “absurd variations” on the 3D-printed gun that he says are meant to undermine its grave depictions as either a security threat to be feared or a tool of liberation to be championed. “My motivation was basically to break down the fear with humor, to get people to kind of remember that this file is out there and that everyone has access to it, that we can take it into our own hands,” he says.

McDonald’s full collection is here.quotesmarksleft.jpg

Read full article.

emily | 10:22 PM | permalink

August 5, 2013

The 3D-Printed Rifle, Grizzly 2.0, Is Getting Stronger By The Week

The second version of the 3D-printed rifle, the Grizzly 2.0, was fired for the first time in a video released Friday, and this time it lasted 14 rounds before a crack formed.

quotemarksright.jpgEven though the rifle is made almost entirely of 3D-printed plastic, the updated Grizzly shoots regular Winchester bullets.

The rifle was made by a Canadian man who goes by "Matthew," The Verge reported. He's the same person behind the last 3D-printed rifle, which broke after just one firing two weeks ago.quotesmarksleft.jpg

[via The Huffington Post]

emily | 5:58 PM | permalink

July 25, 2013

First fully 3D-printed rifle appears to be fired in new video, but it also breaks

A few months after Cody Wilson of the Austin, Texas, based organization Defense Distributed revealed and successfully test-fired the world's first functional, fully 3D-printed gun, a pistol known as "The Liberator," someone else in Canada has now gone ahead and developed and shot a bullet out of what they claim is the world's first fully 3D-printed rifle. [via TheVerge].

quotemarksright.jpgNicknamed "the Grizzly," — in honor of the Canadian built Sherman Tanks of WWII — the rifle appears in a YouTube video posted online yesterday by username "ThreeD Ukulele."

As the video creator explains in the title card, the weapon is a .22-caliber long rifle of the single shot variety, fabricated using a Stratasys Dimension 1200es 3D printer.quotesmarksleft.jpg

Read more.

emily | 8:31 AM | permalink

July 4, 2013

In a Security Test, 3-D Printed Gun Smuggled Into Israeli Parliament

Screen Shot 2013-07-04 at 12.56.29 PM.png

Israel's Channel 10 took a plastic 3D printed 'Liberator' gun past security into the Israeli parliament, and held it within meters of the Israeli prime minister Benjamin Netanyahu.

Haaretz has the video (in Hebrew). You see the journalist sitting in the audience fiddling with a blue and red plastic gun in his lap. [via Slashdot.org]

Daily Mail reporters conducted a similar (pointless) stunt in May. They 'printed' a plastic gun and took it on board Eurostar without being stopped.

What does any of this prove? Poor security checks in both cases, and an issue that should be adressed. What of a plastic detector? And that the media is desperately looking for ways to make headlines...

emily | 12:45 PM | permalink

June 26, 2013

Worried about 'accidentally' 3D printing a gun? New software will prevent it

Screen Shot 2013-06-26 at 10.07.10 PM.png A Danish company that sells 3D printer component parts and related software to 3D printer manufacturers now says it has come up with a firearm component detection algorithm. arstechnica reports.

quotemarksright.jpgOn Tuesday, Create it Real announced that in the coming months its software would include an option to find and block gun parts.

When it detects a file that contains firearm parts, the software will shut down and disallow printing.

Create it Real's software will likely be licensed to 3D printer manufacturers for around "several thousand euros annually" and then bundled with a 3D printer sold to individual consumers.quotesmarksleft.jpg

Read full article.

emily | 10:05 PM | permalink

June 24, 2013

Cody Wilson explains why he released 3D printing blueprints for a gun

Cody Wilson, the founder of Defense Distributor, talks to Moses Znaimer on stage at Zoomer Media's Ideacity Conference in Toronto about why he created and disseminated the "Liberator." [via itBusiness.ca]

His interview is insightful and answers a question I've had on my mind following the removal of the Liberator's blueprints from defcad: Was that to be the last we would hear of Cody Wilson? The answer in this interview is no. Wilson says he "expects the US government to react to some paperwork he has just handed in, in the next 30 days. Justice will then decide what we will do with this kid".

Watch live streaming video from ideacity at livestream.com

emily | 9:01 PM | permalink

June 15, 2013

NYC's New Bill to Regulate 3D-Printed Guns Is Just the Beginning

On June 12th, Council Member Lewis Fidlar (D-Brooklyn) proposed a bill to regulate 3D-printed guns in New York. The bill would make it illegal to produce any firearm via 3D printer unless the maker is a licensed gunsmith. Additionally, the gunsmith would have to notify the NYPD and register the 3D-printed weapon within 72 hours of its creation. Motherboard reports.

quotemarksright.jpgCody Wilson has stayed quiet on his Twitter account, but he sent an email to The Epoch Times, stating "Such legislation is a deprivation of equal protection and works clear ignorance of Title I and II of U.S. gun laws [the Gun Control Act and National Firearms Act, respectively].

... New York was the first state to propose a bill that opposes 3D printed weapons, but it certainly won't be the last. Expect the gun control conversation--and the nascent 3D-printed copyright debate--to only get more complicated from here on out.quotesmarksleft.jpg

Read full article.

emily | 9:39 AM | permalink

June 13, 2013

Bill Regulating 3D Printed Guns Announced In NYC

2013-04-29-ScreenShot20130429at8.13.41AM.png A new bill to regulate 3D printed guns was introduced by Council Member Lewis Fidler (D-Brooklyn) on June 12. The Epoch Times reports.

quotemarksright.jpgThe bill would amend the New York administrative code to make it illegal to use a 3D printer to create any part of a firearm unless the person is a licensed gunsmith. A gunsmith using a 3D printer to print any part of a gun would be required to notify the NYPD and register it within 72 hours.

Proposed revisions to the code include language ensuring 3D printed guns fall under the same regulations as other firearms. This includes clarification on systems to feed bullets, requirements for a serial number, and regulations against destroying weapons.quotesmarksleft.jpg

Read full article.

emily | 9:31 AM | permalink

June 2, 2013

I 3D Printed a Gun

Software engineer Travis Lerol, 30, took about 48 hours to print the electric blue Liberator. He did it using his consumer-grade, $1,300 3D Systems Cube printer, and a grand total of $30 in materials.

This is his story, and the story of how Wilson's dream of giving anybody "near-instant access to a firearm through the Internet" is now an unstoppable reality.

[via Mashable. Watch video]

emily | 9:49 PM | permalink

May 30, 2013

3D-printed guns could doom the NRA

images-1.jpeg Given the NRA’s image as an organization defending the rights of Americans to own guns, you might think that 3D printing enabling the proliferation of weapon production would be a cause the organization would support. The problem? Despite its claim to be a sportsmen’s civil rights group, the NRA is funded in large part by gun manufacturers, whose motives and goals don’t always overlap with those of the organization’s membership. Salon reports.

quotemarksright.jpgIn this new frontier of printed guns, a criminal can simply print off a metal-detector invisible gun for as little as $25, use it in a crime, and destroy it, only to make another one. There are no background checks to avoid, no worries about handling a “hot” gun, and no need to risk being caught buying an illegal weapon. ... In addition to being untraceable, printed guns are made to be identical and there are no distinguishing marks to prove that a bullet came out of a specific gun (e.g., all Liberators are exactly the same and there is no way to link a bullet used in a murder to a specific Liberator pistol).

To put the potential for this situation to spiral out of control into perspective: Less than two weeks after the release of The Liberator, a new design, called the “Lulz Liberator,” was released onto the internet. This design can hold 9 bullets instead of The Liberator’s 1, is cheaper (costing only $25), and is more resilient and less likely to misfire. If such improvements can be made in less than two weeks, imagine what could be developed by the end of the year, or in five years.

... So how will the group respond to the printed gun invention – and potential proliferation of weapons? Will it back gun owners’ rights to more weapons? Or seek to protect the traditional gun manufacturers, by intervening?

Either way, how the organization approaches the issue will reveal much about its true nature. And with the potential industry burgeoning, this decision point is fast approaching.quotesmarksleft.jpg

Read full article.

emily | 9:28 PM | permalink

May 23, 2013

Splint made by 3D printer used to save baby’s life

Screen Shot 2013-05-23 at 6.17.11 PM.png3d-printed-splint-1.jpg

A baby’s life has been saved in the US by using a device to help him breathe created by a 3D printer. The Independent reports.

quotemarksright.jpgDoctors working with Professor Scott Hollister, a biomedical engineer at the University of Michigan, used a 3D printer to make a device like a vacuum cleaner hose which was implanted into Kaiba’s chest to act as splint to hold his airway open.

Three weeks after the operation in February 2012 – which has only now been reported, in The New England Journal of Medicine – he was taken off the ventilator and has not had trouble breathing since.quotesmarksleft.jpg

Read more

emily | 6:12 PM | permalink

3D-Printed Bullets Exist, And They're Easy To Make

Screen Shot 2013-05-23 at 5.57.00 PM.png On Sunday, 48-year-old industrial technician Jeff Heeszel uploaded a video of his friend shooting a 3D-printed bullet from a shotgun. The bullet worked. Not as well as a regular bullet, but, remember, it was made at home on a machine. The Huffington Post reports.

quotemarksright.jpgThese bullets are fairly simple and fast to make. In the video, Heeszel says it took about an hour to print the first slug he shoots. He made it on his friend Tony Griffy's $800 3D printer, Heeszel told Wired.

... Griffy doesn't plan to go into production of 3D weapons or sell them. "It’s really, honestly, just for fun.quotesmarksleft.jpg

Read full article and full interview of Jeff Heezel in Wired.

emily | 5:54 PM | permalink

May 16, 2013

3D Printing Might Make Gun Regulation RIAA vs. NRA

plastic13n-1-web.jpg In the 3D-printed future, politicians who oppose the NRA might do best by aligning themselves with the RIAA if the YouTube takedown of a video of Defense Distributed's Cody Wilson successfully firing the first all-3D-printed gun is a harbinger. PCMag reports.

quotemarksright.jpgThe visual evidence of Wilson's triumph, the greatest marketing tool he has, has been pulled by a claim from Warner Chappell, copyright holder for Patrick Cassidy's "Funeral March," which played over footage of him firing the Liberator.

... Wilson feels that the commotion caused by the Liberator and the YouTube takedown that's related to RIAA-related regulations shows the hand of politicians. "[T]hey're demonstrating to some of the people that know that they're reactionaries and that they would like to control and manage the future, and that's not what this technology means," he said specifically about 3D printing but which applies to his views regarding all technology.

... And that's the biggest effect technology, including 3D printing, may have on society. It's not in what it creates but in what it destroys: the false dichotomies propagated in U.S. politics. First Amendment versus Second Amendment, blue state versus red state, RIAA artists versus NRA members, all blown apart with a single-shot, 3D-printed gun.quotesmarksleft.jpg

Read full article. Image from Forbes.

emily | 8:53 AM | permalink

May 12, 2013

DailyMail reporters 'print' plastic gun and take it on board Eurostar without being stopped

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The exact title of the Daily Mail's article is in fact: "How Mail On Sunday 'printed' first plastic gun in UK using a 3D printer- and then took it on board Eurostar without being stopped in security scandal".

Good grief. Anything for a scoop. In their own words:

quotemarksright.jpgWe built the weapon, which is capable of firing a live round, from blueprints available on the internet – then smuggled it on to a packed Eurostar train. Two reporters passed completely unchallenged through strict airport-style security to carry the gun on to a London to Paris service in the weekend rush-hour, alongside hundreds of unsuspecting travellers.quotesmarksleft.jpg

A Tweet from Defense Distributed on the subject:

emily | 1:57 PM | permalink

May 11, 2013

Make anything: Why 3D printed guns fulfill the promise of 3D printing

While much of the talk on Defense Distributed focuses on firearms, Cody Wilson says the effort is about so much more. ”This project is a way for me to do everything I was ever interested in all at the same time. I want to represent this position in a very pure, forceful way, and I think we did it,” he said. VentureBeat reports.

quotemarksright.jpgTo understand that position, you first have to understand the idea of “crypto-anarchy,” which holds that the most effective route to political freedom is a combination of unhindered access to information protected by the hard math of cryptography. Wilson, a crypto-anarchist himself, argues that everyone has a right to download their own firearms regardless of how many governmental bodies say they shouldn’t.

That’s where 3D printers come in. Because the technology enables us to digitize and replicate physical objects, 3D printers give crypto-anarchists (or even just gun enthusiasts) a powerful new tool to circumvent governmental control: quotesmarksleft.jpg

Read more.

emily | 11:21 PM | permalink

3D gun design links removed from Mega, says Dotcom

Internet entrepreneur Kim Dotcom says he has removed all public links to the blueprints for a 3D printed gun from his new file-sharing website. The Pirate Bay has picked up the slack.

[via Radio New Zealand and C/net]

emily | 11:09 PM | permalink

May 10, 2013

Who's Liable for Crimes Committed With a 3D Printed Gun?

3d-gun.jpg Though the U.S. government ordered that the files for the 3D Printed gun be taken down for fear of international arms proliferation, the designs are out there, accessible through sites such as The Pirate Bay and the "Makers" are presumably still free to print it and whatever else they want with their own 3D printers (such as the MakerBot Replicator 2 or 3DSystems CubeX9). TechNewsDaily reports.

quotemarksright.jpgBut makers without their own equipment also have the option of ordering various objects from 3D printing services such as i.materialise, Sculpteo and Shapeways. Each service offers users the opportunity to shop existing designs as well as create and use their own.

... This puts manufacturers of 3D-printed materials in a gray area from a legal standpoint. Questions arise – could 3D printers and print manufacturers be bound to turn suspicious customers over to authorities? And what are the liability repercussions if, say, a car component is manufactured and then fails? When you consider that smokers have successfully sued tobacco companies, these questions don’t seem so far-fetched.quotesmarksleft.jpg

Read full article.

emily | 5:24 PM | permalink

May 9, 2013

State Department Demands Takedown Of 3D-Printable Gun Files For Possible Export Control Violations

Andy Greenberg for Forbes reports on the State Departments Takedown demand of the 3D printed gun files.

quotemarksright.jpgOn Thursday, Defense Distributed founder Cody Wilson received a letter from the State Department Office of Defense Trade Controls Compliance demanding that he take down the online blueprints for the 3D-printable “Liberator” handgun along with nine other 3D-printable firearms components hosted on the group’s website Defcad.org, while it reviews the files for compliance with export control laws for weapons known as the International Traffic in Arms Regulations, or ITAR.

By uploading the weapons files to the Internet and allowing them to be downloaded abroad, the letter implies Wilson’s high-tech gun group may have violated those export controls.

“We have to comply,” Wilson says. “All such data should be removed from public access, the letter says. That might be an impossible standard. But we’ll do our part to remove it from our servers.”

... It’s not clear whether the file will be taken off Kim Dotcom Mega’s servers, where it may remain available for download. Blueprints have also been uploaded several times to the Pirate Bay.

... Cody Wilson doesn’t see the government's takedown demand of the Liberator’s blueprints as a defeat. 'This is the conversation I want."... "Can there be defense trade control in the era of the Internet and 3D printing?”quotesmarksleft.jpg

Read full article.

Screen Shot 2013-05-09 at 9.04.59 PM.png

Red banner above is a screen capture from Defcad.org website. It reads:

"DEFCAD files are being removed from public access at the request of the US Department of Defense Trade Controls. Until further notice, the United States government claims control of the information."

The full cease-and-desist letter from the State Department has been posted on on VentureBeat.

Below: Tweet from Defense Distributed.

Screen Shot 2013-05-10 at 6.35.26 PM.png

emily | 8:58 PM | permalink

3D-printed guns could be outlawed in California

Screen_Shot_2013-05-08_at_3.46.56_PM_610x343.pngSenator Leland Yee plans to introduce legislation to ban 3D-printed gun technology in order to "ensure that it is not used for the wrong purpose with potentially deadly consequences." C/net reports.

quotemarksright.jpgCalifornia Senator Leland Yee announced Tuesday his plan to propose a law that would ban the technology used to create 3D-printed guns.

"While I am as impressed as anyone with 3-D printing technology and I believe it has amazing possibilities, we must ensure that it is not used for the wrong purpose with potentially deadly consequences," Yee said in a statement. "I plan to introduce legislation that will ensure public safety and stop the manufacturing of guns that are invisible to metal detectors and that can be easily made without a background check.quotesmarksleft.jpg

Read full article.

emily | 9:40 AM | permalink

3D-Printed Gun's Blueprints Downloaded 100,000 Times In Two Days (With Some Help From Kim Dotcom)

Defense Distributed's 3D-printable file for the “Liberator” was downloaded 100,000 times in the first two days, a member of the group told Andy Greenberg from Forbes.

quotemarksright.jpgThe gun’s CAD files have been ten times more popular than any component the group has previously made available.

The controversial gun-printing group is hosting those files, which include everything from the gun’s trigger to its body to its barrel, on a service that has attracted some controversy of its own: Kim Dotcom’s Mega storage site. Although the blueprint is only publicly visible on Defense Distributed’s own website Defcad.org, users who click on it are prompted to download the collection of CAD files from Mega.co.nz, which advertises that it encrypts all users’ information and has a reputation for resisting government surveillance.

Cody Wilson, Defense Distributed’s 25-year-old founder, says that the group chose to use Mega mostly because it was fast and free. But he also says he feels a degree of common cause with Kim Dotcom. “We’re sympathetic to Kim Dotcom,” says Wilson. “There are plenty of services we could have used, but we chose this one. He’s down for the struggle.quotesmarksleft.jpg

Read full article.

emily | 9:13 AM | permalink

May 8, 2013

The 3D Printed Gun: The Calm After the Media Storm

Screen Shot 2013-05-08 at 11.15.08 AM.png James Coleman of 3DPrintingIndustry picks up on an important fact amidst the media storm surrounding the news of the first entirely 3D Printed Gun. Here in Europe, journalists and TV channels such as BFMTV have made headlines stating that the blueprint available on defcad is for an undetectable firearm — which as Coleman points out, is not the case.

quotemarksright.jpg Opinions are divided on the work that Defense Distributed is doing, but it appears that Cody Wilson and his team share the Congressman’s concern for the technology. This concern is revealed by the group’s (oft overlooked) decision to include a 6 oz. piece of steel in their plans for the “Liberator.” This design decision makes the handgun a “detectable” firearm. Aside from helping the group to comply with existing US law, it indicates that their personal aim is not to use 3D printing to produce the sort of undetectable weapon that the Congressman is concerned with.

The “Read Me” instructions that come with the CAD files give very explicit instructions about how to comply with existing law when assembling the “Liberator”. They refer to the steel as an “integral” part of the frame.quotesmarksleft.jpg

Read full article.

emily | 11:07 AM | permalink

Gun from 3D printer poses quandary for gun-control advocates

What makes the 3D-printed gun so dangerous is that it muddies the waters of the gun control debate in a way that makes it harder for proponents of gun control and technologists to agree on exactly what they mean. Dominic Basulto writes in The Washington Post.

quotemarksright.jpgWe’re now able to imagine, create and manufacture things that were outside the realm of possibility for some of the most creative pioneers of 3D printing. Since the designs for the Liberator are available to download for free, should we even be regulating it as a gun—or as a piece of intellectual property? Should the CAD files being downloaded worldwide fall under Internet censorship guidelines?

... “Anywhere there’s a computer and an Internet connection, there would be the promise of a gun.” Well, not quite. You still need the printer, which costs about $8,000. But, as with all other electronics, the price probably will fall dramatically. Critics already perceived the recent gun bill to be inadequate to the challenge of gun violence; criminals and psychopaths need only wait for the printers to get cheaper before they can make all sorts of evil in their basements. And Congress will still be chasing the gun shows. . .

Is government ready for this? It seems no; too often our democratic institutions are still tilting at windmills that long ago became turbines.quotesmarksleft.jpg

[via Max Ehrenfreund in another The Washington Post article on the subject]

emily | 10:56 AM | permalink

May 7, 2013

Is Downloading and Manufacturing a 3D-Printed Gun Illegal?

A very interesting article in Mashable that looks into the legality of reproducing a handgun with a 3D printer — or whether it's a felony.

quotemarksright.jpgThese are the questions that the community around Wilson and his non-profit, Defense Distributed, are asking themselves.

The answers lie in a 1988 law called the Undetectable Firearms Act, which had the goal of banning the production of plastic guns, as they are capable of passing through a metal detector without being spotted. As it happens, the law, which was renewed in 2003 — with no changes — will expire this year.

According to its text, it's illegal for anybody to "manufacture, import, sell, ship, deliver, possess, transfer or receive" a firearm that can't be detected once its grips, stocks and magazines are removed.

... Downloading and working on 3D-printable gun designs is not against the law — and, in case you're wondering, uploading them isn't either. Both Mocsary and another gun-law expert, New York University professor James Jacobs, agree that the law doesn't affect those actions, since those would be protected by the First Amendment.

But turning that blueprint into an actual gun, that's another issue. By all interpretations of the law, that's illegal.

Even Wilson himself recognizes that. That's why in the DefCad "Showcase" forum he posted a two-point disclaimer, telling the rest of the community that if they aren't licensed manufacturers, they should not print a plastic firearm capable of firing a bullet. That, wrote Wilson (who goes by the nickname Zinoziev — a Bolshevik revolutionary and a Soviet Communist politician — on the forum), would be the first step toward committing a federal crime.

"Because of the public profile and interest over this kind of activity at the moment, you WILL be made an example of. You WILL go to federal prison, and you WILL never be able to own a firearm again," he wrote.quotesmarksleft.jpg

Read full article.

emily | 7:14 PM | permalink

Why 3D-Printed Untraceable Guns Could Be Good For America (Really?)

Cody Wilson’s real impact on America may not be technological but political — by sparking a much-needed re-examination of American gun laws, writes Paul Hsieh for Forbes magazine, who's position on this matter dissapointingly, seems to be in favor of less regulation on gun control rather than more. Excerpts:

quotemarksright.jpgGovernment will likely be unable to suppress this application of 3D-printing technology. It would be as ineffective as current laws banning the possession of marijuana.

Current law already allows home hobbyists to build their own firearms provided they are for personal use only (and not for sale). Such guns are already “untraceable.”

Government has a legitimate role in stopping gun crime. But this should not be a pretext for restricting 3D-printing technology.

A desire for private firearms ownership is not proof of “criminal intent.”

Anyone owning an “untraceable” 3D-printed gun should be presumed innocent until proven guilty.

By making it harder (if not nearly impossible) for the government to regulate gun possession and transfers, his development could move the government to instead (properly) focus its efforts on punishing gun misuse.quotesmarksleft.jpg

Read full article.

Interesting: - Why it's almost impossible to get to a gun in Japan

emily | 2:46 PM | permalink

May 6, 2013

'Liberator' CAD files are now available for download on Defcad

liberator_1.png

The first Liberator CAD files are now available for download on Defcad.

Link to Defense Distributor's video for the Liberator.

[via The Verge]

emily | 9:48 AM | permalink

Meet The 'Liberator': Test-Firing The World's First Fully 3D-Printed Gun

liberator5.jpg Cody Wilson took Andy Greenberg of Forbes to a remote private shooting range an hour’s drive from Austin, Texas to document the process of testing the first fully 3D-printed gun.

quotemarksright.jpgOn May 1st, Wilson assembled the 3D-printed pieces of his Liberator for the first time, and agreed to let a Forbes photographer take pictures of the unproven device. A day later, that gun was tested on a remote private shooting range an hour’s drive from Austin, Texas, whose exact location Wilson asked me not to reveal.

The verdict: it worked.

... Defense Distrbuted’s initial success in testing the Liberator may now silence some of its technical naysayers, too. Many skeptics (include commenters on this blog) have claimed that no plastic gun could ever handle the pressure and heat of detonating an ammunition cartridge without deforming or exploding. But Defense Distributed’s design has done just that.quotesmarksleft.jpg

Read full article. Image: Defense Distributed founder Cody Wilson, holding the world's first fully 3D-printed gun. (Credit: Michael Thad Carter for Forbes)

emily | 8:06 AM | permalink

May 4, 2013

Why the first 3D printed gun is legal (so far) and why it's called the Liberator

220px-Liberator-Left.jpgSome more interesting facts picked up after Cody Wilson's announcement via Forbes yesterday that the first 3D printed gun, called the Liberator, has been completed.

Suggested Amendment to the Undectable Firearms Act

According to motherboard, the Liberator is completely legal. As long as it has that metal shank inside and as long as Wilson doesn't sell it, there's nothing the ATF can do to stop him from making or using it. Not yet, anyway.

Rep. Steve Israel, a New York Democrat, introduced an amendment to the Undetectable Firearms Act last year to ban "homemade, 3D printed, plastic high-capacity magazines."

In a press release issued after the Forbes story broke the news, the congressman said:

quotemarksright.jpgSecurity checkpoints, background checks, and gun regulations will do little good if criminals can print plastic firearms at home and bring those firearms through metal detectors with no one the wiser. When I started talking about the issue of plastic firearms months ago, I was told the idea of a plastic gun is science-fiction. Now that this technology appears to be upon us, we need to act now to extend the ban on plastic firearms.quotesmarksleft.jpg

This could be a bill that will pass. The NRA shouldn't oppose it as home-made firearms would hurt gun store sales. But if it did not pass would the gun lobbies still be as powerful? An interesting thought.

The Liberator, a reference to a WW II insurgency weapon? Yes. Wilson confirmed in e-mail: "It is the case."

Slashdot links to an entry in Wikipedia on The FP-45 Liberator, a pistol manufactured by the United States military during World War II intended as an insurgency weapon to be mass dropped behind enemy lines to resistance fighters in occupied territory.

quotemarksright.jpgThe plan was to drop the weapon in such great quantities that occupying forces could never capture or recover all the weapons. It was hoped that the thought of thousands of these unrecovered weapons potentially in the hands of the citizens of occupied countries would have a deleterious effect on enemy morale.quotesmarksleft.jpg

Could this be the reason Wilson named the pistol the Liberator? It's certainly fitting (and ominous). UPDATE: Yes, it is the reason. I asked Cody Wilson by e-mail and his reply was: "It is the case."

Previously: My two minutes with Cody Wilson, a rebel with a reckless cause

emily | 3:14 PM | permalink

May 3, 2013

Cody Wilson shows the world's first entirely 3D-printed gun. Calls it 'the Liberator'

Screen Shot 2013-05-03 at 4.56.15 PM.png On April 23, at the Inside 3D Printing conference in NY, Cody Wilson, said an entirely 3D-printable handgun was two weeks away. Well here it is. Andy Greenberg from Forbes got a first look.

quotemarksright.jpgEarly next week, Wilson, a 25-year University of Texas law student and founder of the non-profit group Defense Distributed, plans to release the 3D-printable CAD files for a gun he calls “the Liberator,” pictured in its initial form above.

He’s agreed to let me document the process of the gun’s creation, so long as I don’t publish details of its mechanics or its testing until it’s been proven to work reliably and the file has been uploaded to Defense Distributed’s online collection of printable gun blueprints at Defcad.org. Stratasys, with the exception of a single nail that’s used as a firing pin. The gun is designed to fire standard handgun rounds, using interchangeable barrels for different calibers of ammunition.quotesmarksleft.jpg

Read full article. Image Credit: Michael Thad Carter for Forbes.

emily | 4:51 PM | permalink

April 24, 2013

My two minutes with Cody Wilson, a rebel with a reckless cause

Screen Shot 2013-04-24 at 2.29.43 PM.png I had the opportunity to speak with Cody Wilson a few minutes before he spoke at Inside 3D Printing conference April 23, as he was sitting next to me. I have a lizard brain so answers "out of quote" are not verbatim. Cody Wilson is very articulate and way too bright for me.

I asked him if he really believed everyone should own a gun or was he just testing the system. He said absolutely, everyone should own a gun, and yes he's testing the system. "Im an anarchist". I asked him about his videos with round firing and distrubingly loud music which are so provoking and he said purposely so," they are propaganda". I was so curious about Cody Wilson since I followed his AMA on Reddit, where he came across in a more personable way than on DD. I asked him if he was still going to school. "Absolutely", he studies law and goes to the University of Texas and has exams coming up - which he didn't think would be a problem. Does he get financing for DD? Yes, he mentioned Bitcoin which he hoped to eleborate on during his talk. He glanced around the room and realized there were mostly media people present. Something I have to wrap my head around, he said. And then my time was up.

Here are some of my tweets from his conference:

emily | 2:19 PM | permalink

3D-printed guns are inevitable

Screen Shot 2013-04-24 at 3.46.12 AM.png Today at the Inside 3D Printing Conference and Expo, Defense Distributed's Cody Wilson argued for an environment in which people can use 3D printers to make guns. and that politicians can't stop innovation. Daniel Terdiman reports for C/Net.

quotemarksright.jpg It's not that Wilson doesn't recognize -- or care -- that there's some likelihood of increased gun violence in such a world, he said. Rather, it's absurd to try to stop people from using the increasingly popular -- and accessible -- technology to do whatever they want with it, he said.

... Sooner or later, like it or not, 3D printed guns will be a reality. Will that mean more people have firearms? It's hard to say. Legislators may find ways to enact restrictions, and the technology itself is still young -- at least from a consumer perspective. But if people must pay attention to anything Wilson said today, it's that 3D-printed guns are here. They may be rudimentary, but -- as is the case with all things in technology -- they only stand to improve with time.quotesmarksleft.jpg

Read full article.

emily | 3:39 AM | permalink

March 29, 2013

Jihadist Suggests Fighters Use 3D Printers to Make Firearms

Inspired by videos he saw of an American who self-manufactures firearms with 3D printers, a jihadist suggested fighters in Iraq and Syria adopt this technology and create their own weapons. In a message posted on the Ansar al-Mujahideen forum on March ... SITE Monitoring Service Jihad Threat (supscription)
via ...

emily | 8:35 AM | permalink

March 28, 2013

Excerpts of 3D-Gun Gun Printer Cody R. Wilson answering questions on Reddit — Now

Following Motherboard's documentary, 3D-Gun Gun Printer Cody R. Wilson in an AMA on Reddit - now.

Highlights from the 1529 comments:

[–]SpacemanD13 18 points 1 hour ago

Do you think its a possibility that your actions could unintentionally lead to knee-jerk government restrictions on the 3D printing industry by those who see your actions as dangerous and provocative?

[–]CodyRWilson[S] 31 points 1 hour ago

Yes. In fact, I've heard there are legislative working groups that are right now studying how to regulate and license printers or materials.

We won't have the luxury of going unnoticed. I share some blame, if you want to think of it that way, but I hope the community can band together with civil liberties groups and defend its technology.

[–]passandmove 10 points 1 hour ago

There's a thread of disdain that runs through a lot of the commentary online about you. People basically see you as a weirdo loner: a guy who's a law student but doesn't really go to law classes (not that that's rare), who has no friends, and displays no interest in anything beyond the printable gun project. So: do you have friends that aren't 3D guns or somehow associated with the 3D project broadly understood? What do you do to have fun? Why are you bothering to finish a law degree?

[–]CodyRWilson[S] 28 points 45 minutes ago

I think there's an interest in painting me as a marginal and lone figure to explain me away, but this just isn't accurate. I'm an affable guy. Class president in high school and college. You might like me if you met me.

But I'm still happy to let that lone weirdo thing stay out there. Spooking progressives is valuable.

[–]NetherBrickHalfSlab 4 points 1 hour ago

Do you think that 3D printers are the things of the future? Do you see them lasting, or is it just a phase?

[–]CodyRWilson[S] 3 points 13 minutes ago

I really wonder... It seems to me the materials will need to be much more complex and improved to drive adoption. But then adoption doesn't seem to be slowing down. We need intrepid people to push the tech if it's going to go anywhere.

[–]majorpaynei86 3 points 43 minutes ago

Not a question, just a comment. I have been following defense distributed from nearly the beginning and saw its potential as a means of providing firearms access to individuals around the world. It is truly revolutionary since these files can be transferred (nearly) instantaneously to every corner of the globe. It diffuses power from centralized government or rogue states to individuals, creating a world where individuals will no longer live according to the whims of others.

[–]CodyRWilson[S] 6 points 34 minutes ago

I want this to be true. And thank you for following us.

It's also a promethean myth. Morality used as a way of controlling an underclass.

[–]Thanquee 1 point 39 minutes ago

Would you consider making illegal designs and spreading them anonymously through torrents, darknet etc? You know, if this all gets illegal too fast, or if you are overcome with a desire to design silencers without a license or, shit, even automatic firearms?

[–]CodyRWilson[S] 3 points 8 minutes ago

Definitely. That's going to happen.

[–]EconHacker 3 points 7 hours ago

Can I 3D print a grenade? Where do you think the line should be drawn?

[–]CodyRWilson[S] 11 points 7 hours ago

Yes. The plans are at defcad.org.

[–]StateExempt 6 points 10 hours ago

I guess there's far more important questions I'd like to ask, but for now when are you guys shipping the AR mags you guys have put up for sale?

Ordered one a couple weeks ago when the store was first started.

[–]CodyRWilson[S] 9 points 10 hours ago

They're out for shipment now! And thank you.

[–]0st 2 points 7 hours ago

Are you only making the larger, quicker guns, or are there plans to make devices like hand guns?

[–]CodyRWilson[S] 7 points 7 hours ago

The hand gun is the actual goal of the project. The receivers were part of an effort to affect the gun control debate while we waited for a license.

[–]pantsnake 1 point 9 hours ago

From what I understand, entire guns are still unable to be printed? How far away is that technology?

[–]CodyRWilson[S] 4 points 7 hours ago

I'm trying to get a fully printed gun finished by the end of April.

emily | 10:17 PM | permalink

March 26, 2013

Click, Print, Gun: The Inside Story of the 3D-Printed Gun Movement

To find out more about Defense Distributed's Cody R. Wilson fight against gun control, Motherboard reporters flew down to his home base of Austin, Texas, where they first met Wilson at his apartment. Watch their insightful video.

quotemarksright.jpg... I wasn’t sure what to make of him. He checked his phone every 10 seconds. He had a hard time making eye contact. Every other sentence ended with “Do you know what I mean?” He spoke on topics ranging from progress in the 3D-printed gun movement to American politics to the inherent revolutionary nature of bitcoins.

... Whatever your thoughts on gun control, it’s impossible to deny that the 3D-printed gun movement is something that doesn’t fit into the current legal framework. It’s either exciting or scary–or perhaps both–and that polarity is something Wilson recognizes, and which he knows how to bend to his advantage. It all made for a rather confusing week in Texas, during which we were often alone with just Wilson, who appears to have few distractions outside of his work with Defense Distributed. He’s created his own world in this mission, where friends or law school grades take a backseat to the message.

It’s impossible to know where that mission will end, but just as it’s clear that 3D printing is set to boom, it’s clear that Wilson and company have changed the boundaries of what that boom will bring. quotesmarksleft.jpg

Read full article.

Related: Above the Law's take on Cody Wilson's Motherboard video interview

emily | 6:37 PM | permalink

March 22, 2013

If you can 3D print a gun at home, you're welcome to shoot me with it

worlds-first-3d-printed-gun-520x363-412x288.jpg Willard Foxton is on the record in The Telegraph as one of the very few people in the tech press who is sceptical about home 3D printing.

quotemarksright.jpgI think it's so unlikely that, if Mr Wilson can home 3D print a whole assault weapon by the end of the year, I will happily fly to Texas and he can shoot me with it. I've still got my BBC-issue flak jacket so, worst-case scenario, I'll find out if your licence payer's money has gone to good use.quotesmarksleft.jpg

Read full article.

emily | 8:30 PM | permalink

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