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April 3, 2014

General Electric on 3D printing: 'We are on the verge of the next industrial revolution'

Screen Shot 2014-04-03 at 9.36.51 PM.png

General Electric says 3D printing and "additive manufacturing" is one of the most important evolutions in modern history, and the best is yet to come. [via ZDNet]

quotemarksright.jpg... As the company continues to learn about the capabilities and advantages that 3D printing has to offer, it's invested in more than three-hundred 3D printers across the company, which helps it to learn how to develop the more difficult or traditionally expensive parts for aviation, oil and gas, healthcare, and other businesses the firm has investments in.

GE's general manager for technology Christine Furstoss said by 2020, the company aims to print more than 100,000 parts for aviation. In the meantime, the company continues to focus on transforming its repair processes for industrial components.

"3D printing is not just used to prototype," Furstoss said. "But it's really important for us to use this technology to innovate and create products that could not be made in any other way.quotesmarksleft.jpg

"This is the opportunity we can't waste," she said. "It's about ecosystems, and learning, and we need to figure out what our role is, and if we are investing as much as we should be."

Read full article.

emily | 9:34 PM | permalink

March 26, 2014

3D Printers for Special Needs Makers

Help make it happen by contributing on Indiegogo, to provide 3D printing tools for speical needs makers in wheelchairs.

The campaign has raised $2,263 so far out of their goal of $5,000 goal. 9 days left!

emily | 9:44 PM | permalink

March 21, 2014

3D printing being used to mass produce ATM skimmers and PoS terminals

An individual known only by the online handle “Gripper” has popped up on several underground cybercrime forums advertising a new service. [via Geek.com]

quotemarksright.jpgUnlike the cheap readers that card thieves have been affixing to ATMs for years, Gripper claims his outfit can mass produce entire readers with a 3D printed casing and the necessary electronics to make everything look legit.

As proof, Gripper provided pictures of the facility in China where these devices are built. He includes a snapshot of a 3D printer making a piece of a VeriFone PoS terminal, completed parts for ATM machines, and several completed VeriFone readers allegedly built from scratch. The ads even mention several widely used systems by name, and buyers get free 24/7 support.quotesmarksleft.jpg

Read more.

emily | 9:22 PM | permalink

February 27, 2014

App snaps your feet to get 3D printed ski boot insoles

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Take a picture of your feet with your phone. Wait. Get cheap, bespoke 3D-printed ski boot insoles delivered to you. New Scientist reports.

quotemarksright.jpgSki boots are notorious for pinching your feet. But instead of shelling out for a new pair or being measured for expensive, specially moulded insoles, why not print your own?

British start-up ALPrint is set to launch an app that lets you create 3D printed insoles by taking cellphone photos of your feet.

These 3D printed custom insoles can be slotted into any existing ski boot to provide the appropriate support and comfort.quotesmarksleft.jpg

Read full article.

emily | 9:24 AM | permalink

January 28, 2014

3D-Print replacement parts for your (broken) drone

Screen Shot 2014-01-28 at 5.23.28 PM.png An open-source community wants to fix your drone with 3D printed parts. Motherboard reports.

quotemarksright.jpgIt’s increasingly common for commercial drone companies to leave the sale of replacement parts up to third-party dealers. If you break a propeller on a DJI drone—a company which doesn’t sell replacement parts on its website—you have to go to a site like Helipal, where a set of two carbon propellers will cost you $21.90 plus shipping.

Joshua Allen Johnson’s solution at CADDrones.com is to get it 3D printed instead. CAD Drones is an open-source community that connects customers with CAD designers and 3D printing companies to make bespoke parts for whichever bit of their drone they smashed into a wall. He said the same propeller would cost roughly five dollars in materials. quotesmarksleft.jpg

Read full article.

emily | 5:25 PM | permalink

January 23, 2014

Warwick helps students with disabilities 3D-print objects to ease their everyday lives

1-warwickhelps.jpg The University of Warwick is helping students with physical disabilities from a local college become their own product designers so they can 3D-print personalised objects that help them in their everyday lives. PhysOrg reports.



quotemarksright.jpgBy learning to use computer-assisted design technology through sessions with staff and students from the University of Warwick, a group of Hereward College students with restricted physical movement have come up with solutions to every-day challenges such as eating and drinking which they can print out with the click of a button.

These include a bespoke straw-holder designed by a student with Muscular Dystrophy to help keep a straw in place when he drinks from a bottle (image left).quotesmarksleft.jpg

Read full article.

emily | 2:37 PM | permalink

December 17, 2013

Shapeways and KeyMe are now in the custom 3D printed key business

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VentureBeat reports that 3D printing marketplace Shapeways is teaming up with digital key storage startup KeyMe to let users print their own custom keys in materials like brass and plastic — which is surprisingly sturdy.

quotemarksright.jpgKeyMe’s mobile app lets users take photos of their keys, store them in the cloud, and retrieve them if emergencies pop up.

The company is positioning itself as alternative to emergency locksmith visits, whose services can — and often do– run for as high as $200. So instead of paying a locksmith to copy their keys, KeyMe customers can pay the company $60 to manufacture and deliver them within an hour.quotesmarksleft.jpg

Read full article.

emily | 5:46 PM | permalink

December 3, 2013

GE Engineers Pick Winner of 2013 Santa Sleigh 3D Printing Design Contest

gI_87872_hyper sleigh 1.jpg GE Global Research announced that a winner has been chosen in its Santa Sleigh 3D printing design contest/GRABCAD challenge, a first-time event bringing together the maker community for some holiday fun in advance of tomorrow’s inaugural 3D Printing Day.

As the winning design, “Santa’s New Hyper-Sleigh” will be mass-printed and mailed, free of charge, to about 200 people who take part in 3D Printing Day via Twitter.

Read full press release. Click here to see a short YouTube video with our judges as they walk through the top 4 designs and explain how they arrived at the winner.

emily | 8:07 AM | permalink

November 21, 2013

Surgeons Practice On Brains Made On 3D Printers

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How much practice would you want your brain surgeon to have? Probably a lot -- and the more specific that practice is to your particular brain, the better. [via The Huffington Post]

quotemarksright.jpg Now, by combining models of brains made on 3D printers and images of simulated surgery, faculty at the University of Florida (UF) are making sure their surgeons get just this kind of training.

Researchers at the university have developed a unique "mixed reality" surgery simulator that gives doctors-in-training a chance to perform real surgery techniques on 3D-printed models derived from actual patients' brains and skulls. Researchers create the models by feeding MRI and CT scans taken from previous patients into 3D printers. Simulated skin covers the printed skulls.

Surgeons-in-training can then, for example, insert a needle through a "patient's" cheek, into the appropriate part of the brain while watching the needle's progress on an imaging screen, just as they would with a device called a fluoroscope during a real surgery. The UF team developed software and completed modifications to imaging tools to make this simulated fluoroscopy possible.

"We can create a physical model, so the residents learn to put their hands in the right position," said Dr. Frank Bova, head of the university's radiosurgery/biology lab, which produces the training simulators. The simulators help surgeons coordinate their eyes and hands with the images they're watching, he said. "When they get their first patient, they're not learning five different, new skills.quotesmarksleft.jpg

Read more.

emily | 2:06 PM | permalink

November 12, 2013

MakerBot Wants To Put A 3D Printer In Every School In America

Academy_BlogHeader2.png There are hundreds of thousands of schools in America. And MakerBot wants to put a 3D printer in every one of them. ReadWriteWeb reports.

quotemarksright.jpgIn order to accomplish this sizeable task, MakerBot has partnered with 3D design software corporation AutoDesk, 3D printing institute America Makes and classroom crowdfunder DonorsChoose.org.

Beginning Tuesday, any person or business interested in getting MakerBot Academy into schools can visit DonorsChoose. Teachers can register their classroom to request a MakerBot Academy bundle. So far, a handful of classrooms, mostly in highly impoverished areas, have already requested the 3D printer.

MakerBot will begin by funding the first few classrooms, at schools in the company’s hometown of Brooklyn, New York, on it's own.quotesmarksleft.jpg

Read more.

emily | 6:27 PM | permalink

November 8, 2013

GE experimenting with '3D painting' to repair metal parts

Everyone is already all over this whole 3D printing thing. But 3D painting? It's a much emptier field. Engadget reports.

quotemarksright.jpgGE is experimenting with such a technology called "cold spray" that slowly builds up layers of metal by spraying metal powder at extremely high velocities. Instead of recreating works of art, the process is used to repair worn metal components, adding years or potentially decades to their life span.

Unlike 3D printing which is severely limited in the size of the objects it can create, 3D painting is only limited by the spread of its spray. That means it could potentially be used to create or repair large structures, and not just prototype scale models of them. In particular, the process is being looked at as a way to repair parts used in oil and gas drilling. It could even be done on the scene and, unlike welding, there's no heat involved -- so there's very little chance for a fire or explosion.quotesmarksleft.jpg

Read full article.

emily | 7:56 AM | permalink

November 7, 2013

The Next Revolution in 3-D Printing: Disposable Panties

Screen Shot 2013-11-07 at 10.15.23 PM.png A somewhat embarrassing feminine-hygiene issue has led Tamar Giloh to develop a new technology that could revolutionize the textile industry. Business Week reports.

quotemarksright.jpgLooking for a way to mitigate problems associated with heavy menstruation, she and a team that included her husband started working on an automated system that can produce fabrics using three-dimensional printing. More than a decade later, the Israeli couple now has functional hardware that can spray polymers and fibers in a controlled manner to produce disposable panties, sportswear, bandages and other products.

... Next year, Tamicare's 3-D printed feminine-hygiene product — absorbent padded underwear that can be thrown away after a single use — is expected to hit shelves in a leading pharmacy chain in Israel. Tamicare said it’s also in talks with a large U.S. company that may sell the women’s undergarments in America. The startup’s compression bandages, which will be sold by a British company, are also set to hit the market soon.quotesmarksleft.jpg

Read more.

emily | 10:09 PM | permalink

3D-Printed Reefs Could Rehabilitate Persian Gulf Ecosystem

Zaffer-Reef-Bahrain1-300x200.jpg Artificial reefs created using 3D printing technology may be effective tools for restoring marine life in threatened ecosystems. Live Science reports via TreeHugger.

quotemarksright.jpgThe waters off Bahrain's coast have suffered from overfishing, but Reef Arabia is hoping its 3D-printed formations will help revive the region's marine diversity.

The group is designing artificial reefs printed using non-toxic sandstone material, which will give the formations a more realistic feel, said Reef Arabia team member David Lennon.quotesmarksleft.jpg

Related: - World's first 3D printed reef to help restore damaged reefs

emily | 9:51 PM | permalink

November 6, 2013

McDonald's considers using in-store 3D printers to create Happy Meal toys

il_fullxfull.358074423_64hb.jpg McDonald's UK IT director, Mark Fabes, revealed that the American fast food giant would consider using 3D printers to make the pocket-sized toys as well as certain pieces of kitchen equipment. TechWorld reports.

quotemarksright.jpgThe idea is that a 3D printer could be used to create a toy that is no longer being supplied in Happy Meals, possibly allowing a child to get the last toy in a series and complete their collection.

“We’ve all been in McDonald's when you’ve already got that one and you want to swap it and the only ones they’ve got are the ones you already have,” he told Techworld, adding that “it would be great” if McDonald's could reprint a toy that was no longer being distributed.quotesmarksleft.jpg

What a perfect fit!

emily | 5:57 PM | permalink

November 1, 2013

Cody Wilson raising $50,000 for an anarchist Bitcoin Wallet

According to The Verge, Cody Wilson, creator of the 3D-printed gun, is raising $50,000 on the crowdfunding site Indiegogo to develop a service aimed at returning the digital currency Bitcoin to its anarchist roots.

quotemarksright.jpgDark Wallet is an app for storing, sending, and receiving Bitcoin, with some extra security features built in. As law enforcement cracks down on services using Bitcoin to evade authorities — the recent bust of the underground drug market Silk Road being the most notable example — Wilson and his co-founder Amir Taaki decided it was important to add new protections.

To accomplish this, Taaki and developer Pablo Martin built a protocol called "trustless mixing." This tactic, which will be built into Dark Wallet, allows a group of Bitcoin users to mix their coins together into one big transaction before it is encoded into the "blockchain," the currency's public ledger.quotesmarksleft.jpg

Read more and watch Cody Wilson present The Dark Wallet, an "unsystem project".

More on Bitcoin: An Abridged History of Bitcoin published by the NYTimes and a video explaining What is Bitcoin?.

emily | 8:24 AM | permalink

October 28, 2013

Robots Created with 3-D Printers to Teach Kids How to Code

PlayiRobots_G_20131025175005.jpg Robots created with 3-D printers are coming and they’re going to teach kids how to code. The Wall STreet Journal reports.

quotemarksright.jpgPlay-i Inc., a seven-person team is on a mission to make computer programming fun and easy. The team has spent the past year or so refining its vision, printing out robot prototypes on its 3-D printer, and scooping up $1 million in venture backing from Google Ventures, Madrona Venture Group and others along the way.

... Kids download the Play-i app which prompts them to choose between a series of icons to create a command series. For example, if a child dragged and dropped a picture of an airplane, a front arrow and red lights, the robot would make the noise of airplane taking off, glide forward and then flash its red lights.

The experience teaches a few things, like causality, sequencing interactions, code re-usability and loops, and sets the stage for them to begin building their own actions using actual code with visual programs including Scratch and Blockly.

To that end, Play-i has opened up its API. The idea is that over time, kids will begin building their own more complex actions and sequences for the robots to undertake and then share them with the larger Play-i community.quotesmarksleft.jpg

Read full article.

emily | 3:59 PM | permalink

October 17, 2013

3D printed horseshoe to improve performance for Melbourne race horse

Chad-Henry.jpg According to Manufacturers Monthly, scientists at the Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation (CSIRO) have custom made and 3D printed a set of titanium shoes for one Melbourne race horse in a first for the sport.

quotemarksright.jpgThe horse had its hooves scanned with a handheld 3D scanner this week.

Using 3D modelling software, the scan was used to design the perfect fitting, lightweight racing shoe and four customised shoes were printed within only a few hours.

Traditionally made from aluminium, a horseshoe can weigh up to one kilogram but the horse’s trainer, John Moloney, says that the ultimate race shoe should be as lightweight as possible.

“Any extra weight in the horseshoe will slow the horse down. These titanium shoes could take up to half of the weight off a traditional aluminium shoe, which means a horse could travel at new speeds.

CSIRO’s Titanium expert, John Barnes, said that 3D printing a race horseshoe from titanium is a first for scientists and demonstrates the range of applications the technology can be used for.quotesmarksleft.jpg

Read full article.

emily | 9:18 AM | permalink

September 18, 2013

Radioshack to offer do-it-yourself 3D-printed digital camera

Screen Shot 2013-09-18 at 8.13.40 AM.png Instructables is partnering with RadioShack to lay out the instructions and parts to provide just about everything you need.

This is a 3D printed digital camera that you can build yourself. It allows you to fully customize the camera to your liking. You can expand the circuit to have new functionality, or design your own custom case by modifying the 123D Design build files.

Screen Shot 2013-09-18 at 8.14.01 AM.png

[via C/net]

emily | 8:10 AM | permalink

September 12, 2013

3D-printed pump keeps damaged hearts beating in time

dn24185-1_300.jpg Your options are pretty limited if you have serious heart failure. Either you get a heart transplant, which are ex-tremely hard to come by, or you have to be hooked up to a bedside system to keep your heart pumping. Now, reports New Scientist, a new 3D-printed, battery-operated implant will let people go about their day-to-day lives while they wait for a transplant.

quotemarksright.jpgDeveloped by Philip Breedon and his colleagues at Nottingham Trent University in the UK, the "smart aortic graft" is designed for people whose hearts have problems pumping enough blood around their body.

Breedon says that his implant eliminates the need to be tethered to a power source. It would be grafted into a removed section of the aorta to improve the heart's effi-ciency. The implant is coated in a material that expands and relaxes when a voltage is applied to it, beats slightly out of sync with the heart to help it pump the blood.

One downside is that the batteries will have to be replaced from time to time, necessitating another operation. But the team is working on ways around this. quotesmarksleft.jpg

Read more.

emily | 9:46 AM | permalink

September 7, 2013

Crowdsourced, 3D-Printed Sculptures Are the Knitting Circles of the Future

663e5d3cf89717fd25d9cf19624176c6_vice_630x420.jpg The crowdsourced sculpture is the brainchild of artist Jeff de Boer, and he's working with PrintToPeer on the project, which just won $1,000 in funding from The Awesome Foundation. The sculpture's called "Linked," to represent the intersection of engineering and art, as well as the more literal interpretation, since the medallions being physically linked together. Motherboard reports.

quotemarksright.jpgThey're creating a living sculpture that will be made up of hundreds of 3D-printed medallions sent into the company from people around the world. Each piece has a a unique design printed on it, and they will all be linked together to form a hanging chainmail-like mosaic.

Many of the makers who've been mailing in their designs (the submission deadline is September 9) have tweeted a snapshot of the printed medallions to #3dcrowd. By browsing the submissions, you can start to image what the final product might look like.

The project may be at the cutting edge of technology, but collective creativity's not a new concept—"Linked" is basically the 3D-printed version of quilting, where each person sews a personal square and they're all patched together. The way De Boer sees it, 3D printers can provide a new medium for the artistic proletariat—like a three-dimensional canvas.quotesmarksleft.jpg

Read full article.

emily | 9:44 PM | permalink

September 3, 2013

3D Printing Featured at London Optical show in February

_3d-pq-springs-mornington-crescent-4235.jpg The innovation of 3D printing and how it is being adopted by opticians, designers and manufacturers globally will feature at next year’s 100% Optical show, the event organiser, Media 10, has announced.



quotemarksright.jpgDuring the three-day London show, which will be held at the ExCel Centre on February 16-18, visitors will be able to see first-hand how 3D printers work and how spectacles can be made using the technology.quotesmarksleft.jpg

Read full article in Optometry. Pictured is the Mornington Cresent Springs frame by industrial designer Ron Arad.

emily | 6:04 PM | permalink

September 2, 2013

3D Printing: Sparking an E-Commerce Revolution

FedEx and UPS, be warned -- you may one day feel the pain the U.S. Postal Service has suffered over the demise of the stamped envelope. In the not-too-distant future, consumers may increasingly be purchasing digital product designs instead of products, which they will then use to manufacture goods in their own little home factory on their personal 3D printer. [via ECommerce Times].

... When we have cheap 3D printers in most homes -- at the same saturation level as ink-jet printers, say -- will we even have products to sell, or will we just be selling product plans digitally, to be downloaded and manufactured on the desktop? For e-commerce, it could mean a U-turn.

Read full article in the ECommerce Times.

emily | 3:04 PM | permalink

August 19, 2013

Loudspeaker firm sounds out 3D printing

Worthing-based loudspeaker manufacturer Bowers & Wilkins is investing in 3D printing technology, reports The Telegraph, allowing the company to run off spare parts quickly as well as providing an outlet for prototypes of new products.

quotemarksright.jpg It means we won’t have to hold large amounts of stock,” says Geoff Edwards, the company’s vice-president of operations.

... Coming out of the recession, we’ve seen the market moving faster. The demand for new technology is greater, so each product’s life-cycle is [shorter] and our investment in equipment and people goes up accordingly.quotesmarksleft.jpg

Read full article.

emily | 7:52 AM | permalink

August 5, 2013

MIT Students Release Program To 3D-Print High Security Keys

Screen-Shot-2013-08-02-at-8.33.33-PM.png At the Def Con hacker conference Saturday, MIT students David Lawrence and Eric Van Albert released a piece of code that will allow anyone to create a 3D-printable software model of any Schlage Primus key, despite the company’s attempts to prevent the duplication of those carefully-controlled shapes.

quotemarksright.jpgWith just a flatbed scanner and their software tool, they were able to produce precise models that they uploaded to the 3D-printing services Shapeways and i.Materialise, who mailed them working copies of the keys in materials ranging from nylon to titanium.quotesmarksleft.jpg

[via Forbes]

emily | 7:50 AM | permalink

July 29, 2013

Economic analysis shows 3-D printing is ready for showtime

Dr. Joshua M. Pearce of Michigan Technological University is predicting that personal manufacturing, like personal computing before it, is about to enter the mainstream in a big way. Phys.Org reports.

quotemarksright.jpg3D printers have been the purview of a relative few aficionados, but that is changing fast, Pearce said. The reason is financial: the typical family can already save a great deal of money by making things with a 3D printer instead of buying them off the shelf.

Pearce drew that conclusion after conducting a lifecycle economic analysis on 3D printing in an average American household.

In the study, Pearce and his team chose 20 common household items listed on Thingiverse. Then they used Google Shopping to determine the maximum and minimum cost of buying those 20 items online, shipping charges not included.

Next, they calculated the cost of making them with 3D printers. The conclusion: it would cost the typical consumer from $312 to $1,944 to buy those 20 things compared to $18 to make them in a weekend.

Open-source 3D printers for home use have price tags ranging from about $350 to $2,000. Making the very conservative assumption a family would only make 20 items a year, Pearce's group calculated that the printers would pay for themselves quickly, in a few months to a few years.quotesmarksleft.jpg

Read full article.

emily | 9:22 PM | permalink

July 26, 2013

Why 3D printers could cause strokes, researchers warn

3D printers can be harmful to humans if they are not set up in the right environment, researchers at the Illinois Institute of Technology have warned, reports The Telegraph.

quotemarksright.jpgMany of the 3D printers on the market today rely on a process called “heated thermoplastic extrusion and deposition”, which emits ultrafine particles (UFPs) into the air. These particles are less than 100-nanometres in diameter.

In an industrial environment, these particles would normally be removed by a ventilation system, but commercially available printers are currently sold as standalone devices without any exhaust ventilation or filtration accessories.

If these particles are inhaled they can build up in the lungs or be absorbed directly into the bloodstream, potentially resulting in adverse health effects including total and cardio-respiratory mortality, hospital admissions for stroke, and asthma symptoms. quotesmarksleft.jpg

Read full article.

emily | 6:45 PM | permalink

July 25, 2013

MIT researchers print squishy 3D teddy bear

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MIT researchers created a new programming language to streamline the process so it will be easier to print objects with multiple materials, so they can be squishy and flexible at one place, firm at another, or reflect light and conform to touch. Right now, making objects like that is an arduous and technically challenging task and beyond the ability of off-the-shelf 3D printing software. Boston.com reports.

quotemarksright.jpgTo demonstrate the advancements, they printed miniature 3D teddy bears and tiny bunnies that are flexible and feel like foam.

Most commercially available 3D printers that transform digital files into physical objects are single-material machines. Those printers can create hard bowls, sculpture, or toys out of plastic, but aren’t able to turn out intricate objects with varied surfaces.<&o>

The 3D printers that Vidimče and his colleagues work with are more advanced than printers most enthusiasts are buying online for around $2,000. The one they used costs about $300,000.quotesmarksleft.jpg

Read full article.

emily | 7:09 PM | permalink

July 24, 2013

World first: 3D-printed ink cartridge

Prototype black and colour cartridges created by 3D printing have been introduced by Lincolnshire-based company Inkfactory.com. E&T reports via @3dplastics.

quotemarksright.jpgThe 3D-printed cartridges, thought to be the world’s first, can print at a comparable speed and quality to conventional Kodak branded cartridges they are modelled on.

"We're excited about a future where customers can download a 3D model of a printer cartridge - or any other object - to print at home, thereby avoiding excessive postage costs," said Tim Johnson, managing director of Inkfactory.com, which has manufactured the cartridges.

The company believes the technology can offer considerable money savings. While a conventional Kodak cartridge costs about £20, the material cost of the 3D printed one is only £1.60.quotesmarksleft.jpg

Read full article. Watch video demo.

emily | 7:30 PM | permalink

3D Printing A Solution To Cervical Cancer

CryoPop.jpg 3DPrinting Industry reports on a new device, the “CryoPop” has been prototyped by using 3D printing technology, producing a solution ten times cheaper and some thirty times more efficient than other treatments in use.

quotemarksright.jpgBiomedical engineers from Jhpiego and Momo Scientific have developed the device, designed to fight cervical cancer using dry ice as a cryogenic agent to freeze precancerous lesions in the cervix.

... The CryoPop is currently being tested. Once complete, Momo Scientific intends to create a supply chain to distribute the CryoPop throughout India and Africa, where the menace of this cancer rages most intensely.quotesmarksleft.jpg

Read full article.

emily | 8:50 AM | permalink

Microsoft’s to ID tag 3D Printed Objects

As 3D printing leads to a proliferation of customized objects, new ways to track and categorize these products are going to be needed. In partnership with Carnie Mellon, Microsoft is developing embeddable, printable ID tags for the next generation of consumer goods. [via Engineering) via @marcodevisser.

quotemarksright.jpgCalled InfraStructs, these minute tags would cost nothing to embed and could be read by terahertz scanning devices, similar to what you’d see in airport detectors. In addition, InfraStructs could be loaded with caches of information that contain all manner of inventory and tracking information, or they could be used in more creative ways.

Andy Wilson of Microsoft Research believes that one day Infrastructs could be used to create customized game accessories with tags dedicated to location sensing, or even a more robust “Internet of Things”.quotesmarksleft.jpg

Read full article.

emily | 8:44 AM | permalink

July 23, 2013

Faithful 3D replicas bring Van Gogh classics to life

15_zonnebloemen02_01_e915fa1ccf.jpg 17_zonnebloemen-vs_01_78424267de.jpg 18_zonnbloemen-vs-detail_01_239baff51d.jpg

The Van Gogh Museum in Amsterdam has been working with a new technique developed by Fujifilm called Reliefography to reproduce the artist's masterpieces in 3D, right down to the finest details. C/net reports.

quotemarksright.jpgThe Relievo not only recreates the front of the original painting but also the back of the paintings including all labels and stamps that were added over the years on the frame. The Relievos are checked and officially approved by curators of the Van Gogh Museum.

Fujiflm Belgium is the technology owner and manufacturer of Relievo. The Van Gogh Museum contributed by its expertise on the paintings and is responsible for the marketing and sales of the Relievos. Both parties worked closely together on the project and will continue to do so. On Monday, 15 July the Van Gogh Museum will launch Relievo in Hong Kong. The launch is part of a pilot which is mainly intended to test the product on the market.quotesmarksleft.jpg

Read more.

emily | 10:30 PM | permalink

17th-century gadget gives up secrets to 3D printer

dn23921-2_1200.jpg Gold and jewelled artefacts from "The Cheapside Hoad" will be going on display at the Museum of London next October 2013. And some of the jewels from the collection will be recreated using a 3D printer. New Scientist.

quotemarksright.jpgResearchers from Birmingham City University in the UK have scanned items like a precious 17th-century watch in exquisite detail, and recreated them using a 3D printer. Visitors will be able to handle copies of the items, something that should be of particular benefit to visually impaired people.

The researchers are also planning to reconstruct replicas which will help them understand the watch's surprisingly advanced features.

... To reveal details of the watch's construction, the team removed the remaining enamel on the surface from their 3D model to show what the metal component looked like prior to being enamelled, says Keith Adcock, who also contributed to the work. "We have effectively used new technology to capture a 'moment in time' during the watch's original making process.quotesmarksleft.jpg

Read full article. Watch video preview of the event.

emily | 7:51 PM | permalink

Two museums in London will examine the future of 3D printing

The Science Museum and the Design Museum of London are opening exhibits to showcase the potential of 3D printing. The Telegraph reports.

quotemarksright.jpgThe first exhibit at the Design Museum opening July 23 and called “The Future is Here: A New Industrial Revolution”, will explore themes of innovation and mass customisation and will house the first ‘Factory’ of its kind where visitors can discover how 3D printing works and witness live production.

The second exhibition,“3D: printing the future”, will launch at the Science Museum on 9 October, and will feature 3D-printed replacement body organs, aeroplane parts and a music box.quotesmarksleft.jpg

Read full article.

emily | 7:15 PM | permalink

July 22, 2013

Digital Locksmith 3D-Prints Keys On-Demand

Insurance company DVV/Les AP is launching a new service that 3D scans keys, so that if you lose them, you can access the files on their secure server and have them 3D printed. [via PSFK]

In their own words: Keysave has developed a specially adapted 3D scanning procedure so that you can scan your keys. Once your keys have been scanned, the scan is put on a secure server, which you have a unique access code to. So that when you’ve lost your key(s) you just logon and download the file and 3D print it, either at 3D printers nearby, or at a friend’s that is lucky enough to own a 3D printer.

emily | 5:41 PM | permalink

July 21, 2013

3D Printers Shown To Emit Potentially Harmful Nanosized Particles

slashdot reports on a study that claims that exposure to fumes from 3D printers is acutely toxic to mammals and humans.

quotemarksright.jpgMany desktop 3D printers rely on a process where a thermoplastic feedstock is heated, extruded through a small nozzle, and deposited onto a surface to build 3D objects. Similar processes have been shown to have significant aerosol emissions in other studies using a range of plastic feedstocks, but mostly in industrial environments.

A new study by researchers in the Built Environment Research Group at the Illinois Institute of Technology shows that commercially available desktop 3D printers can have substantial emissions of potentially harmful nanosized particles in indoor air.

... Because most of these devices are currently sold as standalone devices without any exhaust ventilation or filtration accessories, results herein suggest caution should be used when operating in inadequately ventilated or unfiltered indoor environments. Additionally, these results suggest that more controlled experiments should be conducted to more fundamentally evaluate particle emissions from a wider arrange of desktop 3D printers.quotesmarksleft.jpg

Study: Ultrafine Particle Emissions from Desktop 3D Printers

emily | 10:29 AM | permalink

July 16, 2013

Forget 3D Printing—3D Subtraction Is Going to Arrive in Your Garage First

photo-main.jpg nextgov reports on a portable CNC router which can run from apps on smartphones, tablets or PCs and is as accessible as a 3D printer.

quotemarksright.jpgA funny thing happened on the way to our supposedly 3D-printed future: A simpler, older, but no less revolutionary technology made its way into every automated factory on earth, and now it’s coming to a garage near you. If you haven’t heard of it, it’s mostly because it has a completely unbankable name—CNC routing (or CNC milling.) Also, unlike the usurper technology 3D printing, which has only lately become popular, CNC milling has been around since MIT pioneered the technology starting in the 1950s.

CNC routing is basically the inverse of 3D printing. Instead of using a computer to control a basic armature and print head that deposits plastic or some other material in three dimensions, CNC routing uses a spinning drill bit to carve wood, metal or plastic. It’s the difference between making a sculpture out of clay and carving it from marble, only there’s a robot doing it instead of a human.

And now CNC milling is becoming as accessible as 3D printing. Shopbot, which has made CNC routers since 1996, has launched a Kickstarter crowd-funding effort to launch its Handibot miniature CNC router.quotesmarksleft.jpg

Watch video demo.

emily | 3:40 PM | permalink

July 8, 2013

NYU Offering three week summer 3D Printing class

New York University is offering an intensive three-week summer class in 3D printing that aims to teach not only the basics of 3D printing, but also how to navigate the often complex field of different printer capabilities, materials, design software and more.

quotemarksright.jpg This NYU course, entitled "3D Printing: Rapid Prototyping Intensive," is aimed at bringing the technical skill associated with 3D printing to a broad swath of people, from digital artists to entrepreneurs to hobbyists.

In their own words: "Design projects, create objects using 3D software, and learn how to optimize cost-effective printing. Discuss copyright and distribution, and create an optimized 3D model ready for optional 3D printing at the NYU Advanced Media Studio.quotesmarksleft.jpg

[via TechNews Daily]

emily | 10:56 PM | permalink

French graduate student makes 3D printed analog camera

Screen Shot 2013-07-08 at 8.27.50 AM.png

The above Open3DPrinted Camera (O3DPC) is a project by French grad student Léo Marius.

The O3DPC is an Open-Source analog camera with a mirror Viewfinder, a finger activated mechanic shutter and is compatible with any photographic lens.

The Camera is build in three distinct parts, each with their own precise function :

-- The Film receiver : Will carry the film (35mm) and allow to unwind it.

-- The Shutter : A fast shutter that will expose your film at around 1/60°s.

-- The Viewfinder : Allows you to mount your lens and make a preview of your framings and focus.

All the pieces can be printed on an recent RepRap-like ABS 3D-printer and should print in less than 15 hours. Assembly time takes an hour.

Blueprint is available at thingiverse.

Screen Shot 2013-07-08 at 8.39.44 AM.png

[Instructables via enriquepardo.com]

emily | 8:20 AM | permalink

July 5, 2013

3D-printed dummy landmines teach subtle skills

mg21929246.000-1_300.jpg Abandoned landmines injure or kill hundreds of people around the world every year. They remain an enduring problem in 80 countries and can stay active for decades. New Scientist reports on how 3D printed electronic training mines could make mine clearance safer.

quotemarksright.jpgChristopher Natt, a design engineer at the Royal College of Art and Imperial College as developed a novel way to train deminers, using a clutch of intelligent, 3D-printed landmine facsimiles.

Using a 3D printer, Natt has built precise plastic replicas of four of the most common weapons left after conflicts: three models of anti-personnel mines and a cluster bomblet. Each one has an Arduino circuit board that controls a suite of pressure sensors, accelerometers, LEDs and a Bluetooth link.

... Natt has also 3D-printed a tough polycarbonate shield that he hopes will help make demining safer in another way. When things go wrong and a device is triggered, the explosion is bad enough, but it can also turn tools like trowels into projectiles that cause horrific injuries. The shield, designed with sockets into which longer tools can be fitted, could significantly improve deminer safety.quotesmarksleft.jpg

Read full article.

Related article in The Atlantic - How a Deadly Explosive, When 3D Printed, Could Be Life-Saving

emily | 8:28 AM | permalink

3D printed Custom Game Controllers for People with Physical Disabilities

img_7405-small.jpg Caleb Kraft of Hack A Day designed and devised a game controller system modular and broad enough to help people with disabilities. 3DPrintingIndustry reports.

quotemarksright.jpgKraft's system emulates keyboard presses and mouse clicks, making theses functions available via individual switches that can be positioned on a repositionable lap-board or even attached to the player's body.

US 3D printer manufacturer Lulzbot donated a 3D printer to help, allowing components to be prototyped and tested quickly. All the plans and models have been made available to download on Makerbot's Thingverse and tinkerers everywhere are being encouraged to add to and improve the concept at The Controller Project.quotesmarksleft.jpg

Read more.

emily | 7:40 AM | permalink

July 4, 2013

3D-Printed Human Organs Prep Doctors for Real Surgeries

Screen Shot 2013-07-04 at 11.50.07 AM.png Mark Ginsberg -- an Iowa City jewelry store owner, who also has a manufacturing facility with a couple of 3Dprinters -- has partnered with physicians to help 3D print organ models or whatever they might need, the Iowa City Press-Citizen reported via Mashable.

quotemarksright.jpgA surgeon can provide a CT scan of a patient's organ and that can be translated into information for 3D printing. Recently, Ginsberg 3D-printed a photopolymer heart model for a University of Iowa surgeon, who had a young patient with a hole in the heart, the Press-Citizen reported.

"This way, they can hold the actual heart in their hand, the physiology of that heart, the rendering of that heart, and pregame the direction of the tools, the angle of the tools and how they're going to attack different vessels," Ginsberg told the newspaper.quotesmarksleft.jpg

Read more.

Related: - Doctors use paper 3D printing from McCor Technology to reduce surgical time [video]

emily | 11:47 AM | permalink

July 2, 2013

IBM Uses Live Data To 3D-Print Wimbledon Souvenir Trophies

Screen Shot 2013-07-02 at 9.19.29 PM.png IBM produces an array of real-time data for Wimbledon, and this year the live statistical streams are being brought to life in a unique contest. The IBM Kiosk at Wimbledon is combining in-match player statistics with social media sentiment on the competitors to provide a regularly updated leaderboard ranking the tournament's stars.

The IBM Kiosk staff then use cutting-edge 3D printers to produce a specially designed trophy for the leading player every 20 minutes. IBM has 9 printers going.

Watch video on YouTube.

[via PSKF]

emily | 9:13 PM | permalink

June 20, 2013

Political Protestors 3D Print New Anonymous Masks

Alpay-Kasal-3D-mask-small.jpg

Alpay Kasal, visual artist and co-founder of experiential technology company The Supertouch Group, created his own unique versions of the Anonymous mask using 3D-printing and wore them during the "Occupy Gezi" protests in Istanbul, Turkey.

[via PSFK]

emily | 8:28 AM | permalink

Stratasys to Acquire MakerBot for $403 Million in stock-for-stock deal

rep-600x400.jpg Stratasys, the leader in 3D printing and additive manufacturing, and MakerBot, the leader in desktop 3D printing, today announced the signing of a definitive merger agreement whereby privately held MakerBot has agreed to merge with a subsidiary of Stratasys in a stock-for-stock transaction.

quotemarksright.jpgMakerBot, founded in 2009, helped develop the desktop 3D printing market and has built the largest installed base of 3D printers in the category by making 3D printers highly accessible.

The company has sold more than 22,000 3D printers since 2009. In the last nine months, the MakerBot Replicator 2 Desktop 3D Printer accounted for 11,000 of those sales.quotesmarksleft.jpg

Read more at Investor's Business Daily. [via boingboing]

emily | 8:13 AM | permalink

June 6, 2013

How Ford, GE and Mattel Use 3-D Printers

OB-XS810_hotwhe_E_20130605153223.jpg According to the WSJ, companies such as General Electric, Ford Motor and Mattel are pushing 3-D printing further into the mainstream than most people realize.

quotemarksright.jpgHere is how these three companies use 3-D printing in ways that could significantly impact their business.

Ford

For now, Ford is using 3-D printing to prototype automobile parts for test vehicles, which it has been doing since the 1980s. But the auto maker sees a future where customers will be able to print their own replacement parts. Theoretically, a customer could log onto the Web, scan a bar code or print up an order, take it to a local 3-D printer, and have the part in hours or minutes.

General Electric

GE's Aviation unit prints fuel injectors and other components within the combustion system of a jet engine.

GE is also experimenting with 3-D printing to produce a medical device, the ultrasound probe. The device is placed on the patient's body during medical exams and transmits and receives signals that generate ultrasound images.

Mattel

The toy maker used to sculpt prototypes of toys from wax and clay before building the production models out of plastic. Today, Mattel engineers use any of 30 3-D printers to create parts of virtually every type of toy that it manufactures, including popular brands such as Barbie, Max Steel, Hot Wheels cars and Monster High dolls.

But the toy maker draws the line at selling consumers software files that would enable them to print out their own toys on low-cost 3-D printers. The company can't guarantee today toys that consumers printed out would be safe for children.quotesmarksleft.jpg

Read more.

emily | 8:23 AM | permalink

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