Archives for the category: 3D printing and the arts

March 18, 2014

Bicycle brings 3D printing to Taiwan streets

taiwan-trash-treasure-3d-printing.jpg Cycling through the streets of Taiwan´s capital, staff from a design company turn discarded plastic cups and bottles into pieces of art on the spot with Mobile Fab - an ordinary bike kitted out with a computer and 3D printer. The News reports.

quotemarksright.jpgWe wanted to do something to bring both recycling and 3D printing closer to average people,” said Kamm Kai-yu, a co-founder of the Taipei-based company Fabraft.

Festooned with pumps, wires, tubes and display panels, the Mobile Fab cuts the plastic into strips before grinding it into fine powder.

The operators feed the powder into the 3D printer on the front of the bike, using it as the “ink” to create a small medallion they attach to a coloured light.

People who bring plastic items to the roving lab wait a couple of hours for the trash to be turned into art. The medallion is meant to attach to the spokes of a bike wheel but can be worn in any way the person pleases.quotesmarksleft.jpg

Read full article. Image credit.

emily | 9:47 AM | permalink

November 14, 2013

Now You Can 3D Print Priceless Smithsonian Artifacts

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For decades, the only way to see artifacts like these has been to visit the Smithsonian museums in Washington, DC. And even if you have the time and money to make the trip, you only get to view the item’s front, from behind a glass case. ReadWriteWeb reports.

quotemarksright.jpgToday, 3D design software company Autodesk revealed an advance in technology that will let us get up close to our culture’s our rarest relics. With the Smithsonian X 3D Explorer, anyone with an Internet connection can examine, manipulate, and even print exact 3D models of a few of the Smithsonian’s most precious items.

3D scanning has made the Cosmic Buddha's faded markings sharp again.3D scanning has made the Cosmic Buddha's faded markings sharp again.

"Seven billion people visit the Smithsonian museums every year, but that's only one tenth of one percent of the global population," said Brian Mathews, Vice President of the Information Modeling Platform Group and Group CTO at Autodesk. "We’re making the collection more accessible than ever before.quotesmarksleft.jpg

Read more.

emily | 9:01 AM | permalink

August 26, 2013

Van Gogh in 3D? A replica could be yours for £22,000

The-3D-replicas-of-Van-Go-010.jpg The Van Gogh museum in Amsterdam has developed high-quality 3D reproductions of some of its finest paintings, with what it describes as the most advanced copying technique ever seen. The Guardian reports.

quotemarksright.jpgThe 3D scanning technique has so far reproduced Almond Blossom (1890), Sunflowers (1889), The Harvest (1888), Wheatfield under Thunderclouds (1890) and Boulevard de Clichy (1887). Each reproduction is priced £22,000. Further ventures into Van Gogh's back catalogue are planned.

The replicas, called Relievos, are being created by the museum in partnership with Fujifilm, with which it has had an exclusive deal for three years. Such is the complexity of the technology, known as Reliefography, that it has taken more than seven years to develop and only three a day can be made. It combines a 3D scan of the painting with a high-resolution print. The "super-accurate" reproduction even extends to the frame and the back of the painting. Every Relievo is numbered and approved by a museum curator. There is a limited edition of 260 copies per painting.

Other museums are taking a close interest in the commercial potential of 3D, given that the Van Gogh museum expects to raise substantial funds from sales. The revenue will go towards planned renovations, as well as the preservation of a collection of 200 paintings, drawings and letters.quotesmarksleft.jpg

Read full article.

emily | 4:52 PM | permalink

July 5, 2013

The Giant 3D Paintings of Ioan Florea

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3D printing makes headway in the art world. LiveScience reports.

quotemarksright.jpgArtist Ioan Florea creates giant 3D paintings of abstract shapes and patterns. He uses 3D printing to build prototypes of these shapes, then scales them up using specially developed materials and techniques.quotesmarksleft.jpg

[via 3D Printing Model]

emily | 3:32 PM | permalink

April 25, 2013

3D Printed Paintings For The Blind

midas-touch.jpg A group of students from Harvard have come up with an innovative new way for the visually impaired to experience art along with everyone else. The project is called “Midas Touch” and uses 3D printing to make visual art more accessible. PSFK reports.

quotemarksright.jpgThe basic premise is that 3D printing allows a normal 2D painting to have textures and layers added to it, creating a 3D experience. The result would be a piece of art that includes distinct shapes, textures and transitions – aspects which are much easier for the visually impaired to understand.quotesmarksleft.jpg

Read full article.

emily | 3:27 PM | permalink

April 14, 2013

Andy Warhol Challenge: the finalists!

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Above, one of the five finalists of the imaterialise Andy Warhol Challenge. Their work will be showcased in the Andy Warhol Museum on the opening night of RAPID 2013 in Pittsburgh. Check out the other four!

[via 3D PrintingIndustry]

emily | 9:00 PM | permalink

January 15, 2013

3D Printers Are Changing How Designers Make And Market Art

The Creator’s Project, a video series that looks at how artists are using technology in new ways, recently released a feature on 3D printing.

The video looks at Shapeways in particular as the site has been instrumental in expanding the reach of 3D printing beyond traditional manufacturing. In a way, the site is kind of like the Etsy of 3D printing as designers can sell their creations to the masses.

[WebPro News via @3DPrintingModel]

emily | 8:26 AM | permalink

December 21, 2012

First 3-D Printed Records Sound Awful—And Amazing

3dprintedrecord-660.jpeg Smells Like Teen Spirit written by Kurt Cobain, is part of the batch of the first records ever to be created on a 3-D printer. Wired reports.

quotemarksright.jpgIt’s surprising how much you can deform and down-sample an audio file and still recognize it,” says Amanda Ghassaei, assistant tech editor at Instructables, who printed the record, and several others, including music from the Pixies, Daft Punk, and Radiohead.

Ghassaei used a state-of-the-art Objet Connex 500 printer to generate the disc. For her printed records, Ghassaei sets the machine to its finest setting, 600 dpi, with 16 micron steps, about the highest quality available on the market. But it’s still far lower resolution than on a vinyl LP, by a factor of 10 or so.

... “It’s really stripped down, it’s down to the bare essentials,” she says. “It’s never going to be as good as vinyl. It’s not really set up for that. But it’s cool because you can really be creative with it."

You can listen here.quotesmarksleft.jpg

Read full article.

emily | 8:26 AM | permalink

November 12, 2012

3D sculptures by Eric van Straaten

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3D sculptures spotted on www.3ders.org by Dutch sculpturist Eric van Straaten.

emily | 7:04 PM | permalink

‘Skeleton’ — A 3D Printed Internal Self Portrait

self-21-3.jpeg Artist and sculptor Caspar Berger is renowned for his self-portraits. For his latest project —Skeleton — Berger has used the very latest advanced technology to reveal a portrait of the invisible — his own skeleton. 3D Printing Industry reports.

quotemarksright.jpgBerger had his body scanned in one of the world’s most cutting-edge CT scanners, which produced very accurate 3D data of his living skeleton. This data could then be made compatible for use with a 3D printer to build a precise replica of parts of his skeleton.

From these 3D printed parts Berger went on to make silicone moulds of the bones and then cast copies in bronze and gold.quotesmarksleft.jpg

Read full article.

emily | 2:32 PM | permalink